Cyclone Idai damages estimated at $2 billion: World Bank

This file handout picture released by the United Nations World Food Programme on March 20, 2019, shows an aerial view of flooded houses, after the tropical cyclone Idai made landfall near the heavily-populated Mozambican port city of Beira. (AFP)
Updated 13 April 2019

Cyclone Idai damages estimated at $2 billion: World Bank

  • The UN has appealed for donations of $282 million (251 million euros) to fund emergency assistance for the next three months

MAPUTO: Cyclone Idai which cut a deadly swathe through Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe last month, is expected to cost the three countries more than $2 billion (1.77 billion euros), the World Bank said.
“(E)arly estimates point to over $2.0 billion in recovery costs for the infrastructure and livelihood impacts,” it said in a statement issued after a meeting in Washington on Thursday.
“To date, about three million people have been affected, with near total damage in the worst affected areas,” it said.
Idai slammed into the Mozambican port city of Beira on March 14 then continued a deadly path westward toward Zimbabwe.
In Mozambique alone, more than 600 people died among the 1.5 million affected. About 344 have been killed in Zimbabwe. Southern Malawi was also drowned in heavy rainfall in an earlier phase of the storm, killing 59.
The lender said the cyclone had damaged the infrastructure corridor connecting the Mozambican port of Beira with Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe,“disrupting regional trade and supplies of fuel, wheat and other goods.”
The UN has appealed for donations of $282 million (251 million euros) to fund emergency assistance for the next three months.
The World Bank called for “global collaboration” as recovery and reconstruction gets underway for poor and vulnerable populations “in the face of climate and disaster risk.”


UK to reopen thousands of shops in easing of coronavirus lockdown, says Boris Johnson

Updated 1 min 3 sec ago

UK to reopen thousands of shops in easing of coronavirus lockdown, says Boris Johnson

LONDON: Britain will reopen thousands of high street shops, department stores and shopping centers next month, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Monday, setting out a timetable for businesses as part of moves to ease the coronavirus lockdown.
He told a news conference that from June 1, outdoor markets and car showrooms could be reopened as soon as they are able to meet the COVID-19 secure guidelines, and all other non-essential retail from June 15 if the government’s tests are met.
Johnson is keen to restart an economy which has been all but shut down since Britain entered a lockdown to try to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus, but also fears a second peak of infection if measures are eased too quickly.
“Today, I want to give the retail sector notice of our intentions to reopen shops, so they too can get ready,” Johnson said. “There are careful but deliberate steps on the road to rebuilding our country.”
The government said shops selling clothes, shoes, toys, furniture, books, and electronics, plus tailors, auction houses, photography studios, and indoor markets, would be expected to be able to reopen from June 15, giving them three weeks to prepare.
It said that businesses would only be able to open from those dates once they had completed a risk assessment, in consultation with trade union representatives or workers, and are confident they are managing the risks.
“The high street sits at the heart of every community in the country,” Business minister Alok Sharma said in a statement.
“Enabling these businesses to open will be a critical step on the road to rebuilding our economy, and will support millions of jobs across the UK.”