121 killed, nearly 600 wounded in Libya fighting: WHO

The fighting broke out on April 4. (AFP/File)
Updated 14 April 2019

121 killed, nearly 600 wounded in Libya fighting: WHO

  • WHO said they will send supplies and staff to Tripoli
  • The organization also disapproved of the attacks on medical staff and their vehicles

TRIPOLI: Fighting near Tripoli has killed 121 people and wounded 561 since strongman Khalifa Haftar launched an offensive earlier this month to take the Libyan capital, the World Health Organization said Sunday.

WHO’s Libya account said on Twitter the organization was sending medical supplies and more staff to Tripoli, and denounced “repeated attacks on health care workers, vehicles” during the fighting which erupted on April 4.

Haftar’s forces, which control swathes of the country’s east, have defied international calls to halt their battle against fighters loyal to the UN-backed Government of National Accord based in Tripoli.

The United Nations’ office for humanitarian affairs said more than 13,500 people had been displaced by the clashes, while more than 900 residents are living in shelters.

“Three medical personnel have been killed and five ambulances have been incapacitated by shrapnel,” OCHA said in a Saturday statement.

As well as fighting on the ground, the two sides have launched daily air raids and accuse each other of targeting civilians.

The north African country has been in turmoil since the NATO-backed overthrow of dictator Muammar Qaddafi in 2011, which has led to the creation of a bewildering array of militias all seeking to take control.

Haftar backs a rival administration based in eastern Libya that refuses to recognize the UN-backed unity government led by Fayez Al-Sarraj.


Israel starts to install sensors along Lebanon border

Updated 45 min 45 sec ago

Israel starts to install sensors along Lebanon border

  • Work would get underway Sunday at the Israeli kibbutz town of Misgav Am to deploy the new noise-detecting technology
  • The move comes a year after Israel concluded a weeks-long operation to destroy tunnels it accused Lebanese Shiite group Hezbollah of building

JERUSALEM: Israel’s army said it would start drilling to install ground sensors along its border with Lebanon on Sunday, a year after an operation to destroy tunnels dug across the frontier.
“We are deploying a defensive system into the ground.. in various locations” along the border, spokesman Lt. Col. Jonathan Conricus told journalists.
Work would get underway Sunday at the Israeli kibbutz town of Misgav Am, he said, to deploy the new noise-detecting technology.
The move comes a year after Israel concluded a weeks-long operation to destroy tunnels it accused Lebanese Shiite group Hezbollah of building.
At least six tunnels were discovered in the operation dubbed “Northern Shield” along the border where a United Nations peacekeeping force is deployed.
Conricus said the drilling is “not related to any new intelligence” and all military activity would take place on the Israeli side of the border.
Work at Misgav Am is expected to last a number of weeks before the sensors are installed along other sections of the border.
“We understand that our activity might be seen, and most probably will be heard, on the Lebanese side,” said Conricus.
Israel has notified the UNIFIL peacekeeping force which patrols the “blue line” drawn by the UN to mark Israel’s withdrawal from southern Lebanon in 2000.
Lebanon and Israel are still technically at war.
A month-long conflict in 2006 between Israel and Hezbollah killed more than 1,200 Lebanese, mostly civilians, and more than 160 Israelis, mostly soldiers.