‘Age-Old Cities’ exhibition in Riyadh museum breathes new life into ancient sites 

Prince Badr bin Abdullah Al-Saud
Updated 21 April 2019

‘Age-Old Cities’ exhibition in Riyadh museum breathes new life into ancient sites 

  • National Museum in Riyadh hosts digital show that tells the story of Mosul, Palmyra, Aleppo and Leptis Magna

JEDDAH: An exhibition that uses digital technology to revive the region’s ancient sites and civilizations that have been destroyed or are under threat due to conflict and terrorism opened at the National Museum in Riyadh on April 18.

“Age-Old Cities” tells the story of four historically significant cities that have been devastated by violence: Mosul in Iraq, Palmyra and Aleppo in Syria, and Leptis Magna in Libya. 

Using stunning giant-screen projections, virtual reality, archival documents and images, and video testimonials from inhabitants of the affected sites, the immersive exhibition transports visitors back in time and presents the cities as they were in their prime. 

It charts their journey from the origins of their ancient civilizations to their modern-day state, and presents plans for their restoration and repair. 

The exhibition has been organized by the Ministry of Culture in collaboration with the Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris. Riyadh is the first stop outside the French capital on the exhibition’s global tour. 

The exhibition follows last month’s unveiling of the Kingdom’s new cultural vision, which included the announcement of several initiatives, including a new residency scheme for international artists to practice in the Kingdom and the establishment of the Red Sea International Film Festival. 

Prince Badr bin Abdullah bin Farhan Al-Saud, minister of culture, said: “I am delighted to welcome the ‘Age-Old Cities’ exhibition to Riyadh. 

“It highlights the importance of heritage preservation, particularly here in the Middle East, and the vulnerability of some of our historic sites. 

“It must be the responsibility of governments to put an end to this damage and neglect, and to put heritage at the heart of action, investment, and policy.

“I will be encouraging my fellow members of government to attend this eye-opening exhibition in our National Museum, and hope to work in the future with partners, governments and experts to do what we can to secure our region’s heritage.”

The exhibition carries a significant message about the importance of preserving and protecting these precious but fragile sites — one which resonates strongly in the week when one of the world’s most-famous heritage sites, Paris’ Notre-Dame Cathedral, went up in flames.


Environmentally conscious Coldplay says it won’t tour new album, ahead of Jordan gigs

Updated 21 November 2019

Environmentally conscious Coldplay says it won’t tour new album, ahead of Jordan gigs

  • Chris Martin: We’re not touring this album. We’re taking time over the next year or two to work out how our tour (can not only) be sustainable but how can it be actively beneficial
  • Coldplay will perform two shows in Jordan on Friday to mark the album Everyday Life’s release

LONDON: British band Coldplay will not tour to promote their new album, but are working on how to make their gigs environmentally sustainable, lead singer Chris Martin said.
The rock group, known for songs like “Yellow,” “Paradise” and “Viva la Vida,” will release their eighth studio album “Everyday Life” on Friday. The 52-minute record is made up of two halves, “Sunrise” and “Sunset.”
“We’re not touring this album. We’re taking time over the next year or two to work out how our tour (can not only) be sustainable but how can it be actively beneficial,” Martin told British broadcaster BBC in Jordan, where Coldplay will perform two shows on Friday to mark the album’s release.
“Our dream is to have a show with no single-use plastic, to have it be largely solar-powered.”
Coldplay will play a one-off show at London’s Natural History Museum on Monday to promote the album. All performance proceeds will go to environmental charity ClientEarth.
“This is expected to be the band’s only UK show of the ‘Everyday Life’ era,” a press release for the show said.
Coldplay last toured globally in 2016-2017 to promote album “A Head Full of Dreams.”
“All of us, in every industry, have to just work out what the best way of doing our job is ... The hardest thing is the flying side of things,” Martin said.
Amid growing environmental concerns from consumers and young fans, several music artists have addressed climate change in lyrics or announced plans to improve their green credentials.
Rockers The 1975 teamed up with climate activist Greta Thunberg for a track on their upcoming album in which the teenage Swedish activist warns about climate change.
“It is fantastic to see world famous artists stepping up to protect the planet,” Gareth Redmond-King, head of Climate Change at the WWF conservation group, said in a statement.
“We all have a responsibility to lead by example in the face of this climate and nature crisis — inaction is not an option if we are to preserve our planet for future generations.”