US poised to end waivers for 5 countries importing Iranian oil

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is expected to announce the Trump administration's decision on the request of five nations, including allies Japan, South Korea and Turkey, for an extension of the exemption the US had granted them on sanctions against importing oil from Iran. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)
Updated 22 April 2019

US poised to end waivers for 5 countries importing Iranian oil

  • Japan, South Korea, Turkey, China and India were exempted from sanctions until May 2
  • Since November, Italy, Greece and Taiwan have stopped importing oil from Iran

WASHINGTON: The Trump administration is poised to tell five nations, including allies Japan, South Korea and Turkey, that they will no longer be exempt from US sanctions if they continue to import oil from Iran, officials said Sunday.
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo plans to announce on Monday that the administration will not renew sanctions waivers for the five countries when they expire on May 2, three US officials said. The others are China and India.
It was not immediately clear if any of the five would be given additional time to wind down their purchases or if they would be subject to US sanctions on May 3 if they do not immediately halt imports of Iranian oil.
The officials were not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity ahead of Pompeo’s announcement.
The decision not to extend the waivers, which was first reported by The Washington Post, was finalized on Friday by President Donald Trump, according to the officials. They said it is intended to further ramp up pressure on Iran by strangling the revenue it gets from oil exports.
The administration granted eight oil sanctions waivers when it re-imposed sanctions on Iran after Trump pulled the US out of the landmark 2015 nuclear deal. They were granted in part to give those countries more time to find alternate energy sources but also to prevent a shock to global oil markets from the sudden removal of Iranian crude.
US officials now say they do not expect any significant reduction in the supply of oil given production increases by other countries, including the US itself and Saudi Arabia.
Since November, three of the eight — Italy, Greece and Taiwan — have stopped importing oil from Iran. The other five, however, have not, and have lobbied for their waivers to be extended.
NATO ally Turkey has made perhaps the most public case for an extension, with senior officials telling their US counterparts that Iranian oil is critical to meeting their country’s energy needs. They have also made the case that as a neighbor of Iran, Turkey cannot be expected to completely close its economy to Iranian goods.


Saudi Arabia opens new logistics zone in Jeddah

Updated 13 October 2019

Saudi Arabia opens new logistics zone in Jeddah

  • The Al-Khomra zone extends over 2.3m square meters in Jeddah
  • It will support activities around shipping, freight distribution and transport of goods

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia launched on Sunday a new logistics zone open to private investors in the Red Sea port city of Jeddah, as part of a wider industrial initiative to diversify the economy away from oil and create jobs for Saudis.
The Al-Khomra zone — which will support activities around shipping, freight distribution and transport of goods — extends over 2.3 million square meters in Jeddah, home to one of the Kingdom’s largest ports.
As the biggest logistics zone in the country, it hopes to turn Saudi Arabia into a global logistics hub and create 10,000 direct jobs, said Minister of Transport Nabeel Al-Amudi.
It is part of the broader National Industrial Development and Logistics Program (NIDLP), which aims to create 1.6 million jobs and attract investments worth SR 1.6 trillion ($427 billion) over the next decade. Of that, SR 135 billion is earmarked for investment in the logistics sector.
Under its ambitious reform strategy, the Kingdom plans to have the private sector operate much of its transport infrastructure, including airports and sea ports, with the government keeping a role as regulator.
Details of what the government plans to offer investors in Al-Khomra were not disclosed, but the Saudi Ports Authority  (Mawani) said the zone would offer opportunities to investors on a lease basis.
“Investment in the logistics zone in Al-Khomra and other ports will total SR 7 billion,” said Saad Al-Khalb, president of the Saudi Ports Authority.
Al-Khomra joins other logistics zones in the `kingdom — the King Abdullah Economic City north of Jeddah has its own port and offers logistics investments and NEOM, a mega project announced in 2017, has plans for a logistics zone.
Over a decade ago, the Saudi government spent $30 billion to build six economic cities across the Kingdom to diversify the economy, create jobs for young Saudis and attract foreign investment, though many of the projects have failed to achieve expected results.
After decades of spending on development projects, the government has made attracting greater foreign investment a cornerstone of its Vision 2030 plan.