MODON to establish integrated pharmaceutical complex

Officials sign the agreement for the new plant. (MODON)
Updated 24 May 2019

MODON to establish integrated pharmaceutical complex

JEDDAH: The Saudi Authority for Industrial Cities and Technology Zones (MODON) has signed an industrial land lease covering more than 62 thousand square meters in the city of Madinah, to build a pharmaceutical complex including research and development centers, with a total investment reaching SR 570 million.

MODON’s Director General Khalid bin Mohammed Al-Salem said that the signing of the contract was the result of joint work with the National Program for the Development of Industrial Compounds. MODON provided various facilities and incentives to support the investment, with the project set to provide nearly 1000 jobs for both genders with a localization rate exceeding 50 percent.

He added that the project is in line with the goals of the National Industrial and Logistics Development Program (NIDLP) to localize the most advanced industries in the world, in accordance with Saudi Vision 2030 for economic diversification.

Since its inception in 2001, MODON has been developing integrated industrial lands in accordance with the highest international standards. It currently oversees 35 industrial cities under development in various regions of the Kingdom, in addition to supervising private industrial parks and cities. The developed industrial lands exceeded until today 198.8 million square meters, while the existing industrial cities include 3,474 productive factories.


BT warns UK that banning Huawei too fast could cause outages

Updated 13 July 2020

BT warns UK that banning Huawei too fast could cause outages

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson is due to decide this week whether to impose tougher restrictions on Huawei
  • British PM in January granted Huawei a limited role in the 5G network

LONDON: BT CEO Philip Jansen urged the British government on Monday not to move too fast to ban China’s Huawei from the 5G network, cautioning that there could be outages and even security issues if it did.
Prime Minister Boris Johnson is due to decide this week whether to impose tougher restrictions on Huawei, after intense pressure from the United States to ban the Chinese telecoms behemoth from Western 5G networks.
Johnson in January defied President Donald Trump and granted Huawei a limited role in the 5G network, but the perception that China did not tell the whole truth over the coronavirus crisis and a row over Hong Kong has changed the mood in London.
“If you are to try not to have Huawei at all, ideally we would want seven years and we could probably do it in five,” Jansen told BBC radio.
Asked what the risks would be if telecoms operators were told to do it in less than five years, Jansen said: “We need to make sure that any change of direction does not lead to more risk in the short term.”
“If we get to a situation where things need to go very, very fast, then you are into a situation where potentially service for 24 million BT Group mobile customers is put into question — outages,” he said.
In what some have compared to the Cold War antagonism with the Soviet Union, the United States is worried that 5G dominance is a milestone toward Chinese technological supremacy that could define the geopolitics of the 21st century.
The United States says Huawei is an agent of the Chinese Communist State and cannot be trusted.
Huawei, the world’s biggest producer of telecoms equipment, has said the United States wants to frustrate its growth because no US company could offer the same range of technology at a competitive price.