Raptors beat Bucks to reach first NBA final

Raptors beat Bucks to reach first NBA final
Kawhi Leonard #2 of the Toronto Raptors drives to the basket during the second half against the Milwaukee Bucks in game six of the NBA Eastern Conference Finals at Scotiabank Arena on May 25, 2019 in Toronto, Canada. (AFP)
Updated 26 May 2019

Raptors beat Bucks to reach first NBA final

Raptors beat Bucks to reach first NBA final

TORONTO: Kawhi Leonard had 27 points and 17 rebounds to lead the Toronto Raptors into the NBA Finals for the first time with a 100-94 victory over the Milwaukee Bucks on Saturday night.
The Raptors overcame a 15-point deficit to win the series in six games and will host the Golden State Warriors in Game 1 of the NBA Finals on Thursday night.
Pascal Siakam scored 18 points, Kyle Lowry had 17 and Fred VanVleet 14 for the Raptors, who used a 26-3 run late in the third quarter and early in the fourth to turn the game in their favor.
Giannis Antetokounmpo led the Bucks with 21 points and 11 rebounds, but the NBA’s top team in the regular season saw its bid for a first finals berth in 45 years come to a disappointing end with a fourth consecutive defeat.
Down 76-71 to start the fourth, the Raptors tied it with an 8-2 run while Leonard and Antetokounmpo were both on the bench. Ibaka’s dunk with 10:32 to go tied it at 78.
Antetokounmpo returned after a timeout, but Leonard kept sitting. That didn’t matter to Toronto, with Siakam’s basket giving the Raptors an 80-78 lead, their first lead since it was 6-3.
Leonard’s one-handed slam after Lowry’s steal gave Toronto an 87-79 lead with 6:46 to go before the Bucks responded. George Hill answered with a layup, Brook Lopez converted a three-point play and Antetokounmpo scored to cut it to 87-86 with 5:19 to go.
Lowry and Lopez swapped baskets before Gasol’s 3 put the Raptors up 92-88 with 3:50 left. After another basket by Lopez, Leonard made a 3 to push Toronto’s lead to 95-90 with 3:04 to play. It was Leonard’s first 3 after missing his first seven attempts of the game.
Toronto made 12 of 27 3-point attempts, including four of eight in the fourth quarter.
Siakam, who missed a pair of free throws late in the fourth quarter of Toronto’s double-overtime win in Game 3, hit one to make it 98-94. Leonard grabbed the rebound on the second and was fouled. He made both, putting the Raptors up 100-94 with 3.9 seconds to go.
Brogdon and Middleton each made a pair from long range as the Bucks shot 6 for 9 from 3-point range in the first and closed the quarter with 10 unanswered points to lead 31-18. Toronto shot 6 for 19 in the opening quarter, missing six straight twice in the first 12 minutes.
The Bucks extended their lead to 38-23 on a 3 by Ersan Ilyasova with 7:46 left until half. Toronto cut the gap to 46-43 on a 3 by VanVleet with 1:07 left in the second, but Eric Bledsoe answered with a 3 and Antetokounmpo split a pair at the line, giving the Bucks a 50-43 advantage at the intermission.
The lead went back to 15 in the third before Leonard finished the period with a flourish. He had eight points in the final 2:01 and Toronto closed with a 10-0 run, cutting a 15-point deficit to 76-71.
TIP-INS
Bucks: Milwaukee shot 4 for 16 in the second but three of its made baskets were 3-pointers. ... The Bucks had six points in the paint in the first half. ... Coach Mike Budenholzer was called for a technical foul on Milwaukee’s first possession of the second half. Leonard missed the free throw. ... Antetokounmpo shot 5 for 10 at the free throw line.
Raptors: Danny Green, who missed all three of his field goal attempts in 16 minutes in Game 5, had another rough night. Green shot 0 for 4 in 14 minutes. ... Leonard’s 17 rebounds were his most in any game this postseason. ... Lowry had eight assists.
DRAKE WATCH
Raptors fan and ‘global ambassador’ Drake sat in his regular seat adjacent to the Toronto bench. The rapper wore a black hoodie with ‘KAWHI ME A RIVER’ printed on the back.
UP NEXT
The NBA Finals comes to Canada for the first time when the Raptors host the Warriors on Thursday night. Toronto swept Golden State in the regular season.
 


Saudi golfer Alsharif says game in the Kingdom ‘better than ever’

Saud Alsharif has called on more young potential golf stars to make the most of what is available to them throughout Saudi Arabia and the wider region. (Golf Saudi/File Photo)
Saud Alsharif has called on more young potential golf stars to make the most of what is available to them throughout Saudi Arabia and the wider region. (Golf Saudi/File Photo)
Updated 19 January 2021

Saudi golfer Alsharif says game in the Kingdom ‘better than ever’

Saud Alsharif has called on more young potential golf stars to make the most of what is available to them throughout Saudi Arabia and the wider region. (Golf Saudi/File Photo)
  • World’s best players preparing for Saudi International this February
  • Alsharif said no excuse for more Arab talent not to take up golf

RIYADH: Saudi golfer Saud Alsharif believes having the sport's best players competing in Saudi Arabia is key to the development and growth of the game in the Kingdom. 

World number one Dustin Johnson will be joined by the likes of US Open champion Bryson DeChambeau as well as European superstars Tommy Fleetwood and Sergio Garcia at the Saudi International in February.

Royal Greens Golf Club will host the third edition of the event, which is once again one of the opening events on the European Tour calendar.

Johnson won the first Saudi International in 2019, recording an impressive 19 under par, whilst Northern Irishman Graeme McDowell secured victory at last year’s tournament.

“Players like Dustin (Johnson) and Brooks (Koepka) coming to Saudi is a real honour and I really do wish I can play with any of these guys – they are massive stars in world golf. For golf fans in Saudi to see Dustin Johnson and others is incredible – they are some of the best sportsmen in the world, Alsharif said.

“Three years ago we didn’t have any big, global event in Saudi and right now we have the biggest golf event in the Middle East with the biggest field so it really is booming. It really does help the golf community in Saudi Arabia and encourage more people to take this up.”

Growing up in the region, Saud didn’t have anywhere near the same accessibility to coaches or facilities as today’s young hopefuls – and he has called on more young potential stars to make the most of what is available to them throughout Saudi Arabia and the wider region.

“Right now golf in Saudi Arabia is better than I could have ever imagined it. We have everything we need to go out and play the best golf we can. We’ve got coaching throughout the game, including on the mental side of the game,” he said. 

“We’ve also got great facilities too and its exciting that there is young talent coming through.

“Previously it used to be travelling to play in local events with a lot less coaching and a team gathering every three or four months in Riyadh – that was pretty much it. Now we have good relationships with our coaches where we can see them more and the team can sign us up to compete in more events too.

Whatever you wish for, it is there, so there is no excuse for us not to go out there and play well,” he added.

Tournament preparations have been different this time around due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and the restrictions placed on competitions and travel, but Alsharif said that has had limited impact on his own confidence as he looks to improve on previous years in the competition.

“It’s been very quiet with COVID and travel so we haven’t been able to play. I played an event in Bahrain last month which was nice to get into. Unfortunately, I lost in the play-off but I keep working very hard with Jamie (McDonnell, coach and caddy). I can’t see him at the moment, but we communicate a lot,” he said.

“I’m very excited but I’m also really relaxed going into this event. I know I haven’t played a lot of events recently but I have so much confidence in my game right now because of the practice over the year.

“One thing that stood out last year was my decision making on the course and the caddy/player relationship and how we talked on the course.

“It’s a big part of the game and its important. You need a good caddy and Jamie was there for me and he did such a great job for me last year on this course.

“I went from shooting 85 to 75,and that is all down to decision making. I was going into the first round very excited, taking on shots and not really taking on the game plan and managing it as we discussed.

“That really affected me on the first day but on the second day it was the complete opposite, I was completely relaxed and I listened to my caddy and the results showed that,” he added.

Saud will be joined by fellow Saudi Othman Almulla as the two local representatives competing at the tournament, which runs Feb. 4-7.

For more information visit www.saudiinternational.com