UK to provide £1.6m aid package to help save limbs in Gaza

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The UK aid support to Gaza will establish a limb reconstruction unit to provide centralized expertise for patients with complex injuries including gunshot wounds. (File/AFP)
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Updated 29 May 2019
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UK to provide £1.6m aid package to help save limbs in Gaza

  • The package to the World Health Organization comes after thousands of Gazans were wounded by Israeli fire during weekly protests
  • The money will go towards building a limb reconstruction center

LONDON: Britain is to provide a £1.6 million aid package to help build a limb reconstruction center in Gaza.

The funds will go to the World Health Organization and will provide life-saving medical treatment for more than 380,000 people, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office said.

Gaza’s ailing health service has been plunged into further crisis by the thousands of Palestinians injured from Israeli live fire during more than a year of protests near their shared border.

At least 190 people have been killed and 6,800 wounded during the weekly protests and the United Nations warned last week that an additional 1,700 people could lose limbs without an injection of funds.

The Foreign Office said the package of support would relieve the extreme pressure on Gaza’s health service, which is struggling to cope with thousands of patients in need of trauma care. 

 

"I’ve seen first-hand how important this new UK aid package is to save the lives and limbs, relieving at least some of the strain on Gaza’s health system,” Andrew Murrison, Britain’s Minister for the Middle East, said.

The UK would also provide valuable expertise to help Gaza’s health service deal with emergency patients and complex injuries including gunshot wounds.

The package includes equipment, such as radios and GPS maps, to help the ambulance service improve its ability to respond.




At least 190 people have been killed and 6,800 wounded during the weekly protests and the UN warned that an additional 1,700 people could lose limbs without an injection of funds. (AP)

“But only a just and lasting resolution that ends the occupation and delivers peace for both Israelis and Palestinians will fully resolve the problems facing Gaza," Murrison said. "The UK remains committed to making progress toward a two-state solution.”

Gaza, which is ruled by the hardline Hamas group, has been under a punishing blockade from Israel for more than a decade. 

The siege has crippled services and led to a humanitarian crisis exacerbated by a series of military operations against the territory.


Thousands protest in Algiers despite tight security

Updated 20 September 2019

Thousands protest in Algiers despite tight security

  • Salah on Wednesday ordered police to block protesters from outside Algiers entering the capital to boost numbers at the anti-regime rallies
  • Friday's protest marked Algeria's 31st consecutive week of rallies

ALGIERS: Thousands of protesters took to the streets of the Algerian capital on Friday in defiance of a heavy security presence to demand the ouster of the country's army chief.
Demonstrators gathered near the capital's main post office square, the epicentre of Algeria's protest movement that forced longtime president Abdelaziz Bouteflika to step down in April, this time calling for the ouster of General Ahmed Gaid Salah.
"The people want the fall of Gaid Salah," the strongman in post-Bouteflika Algeria, they chanted. "Take us all to prison, the people will not stop."
Friday's protest marked Algeria's 31st consecutive week of rallies, but protesters faced a heavy deployment of security forces in the city centre and along its main avenues.
Salah on Wednesday ordered police to block protesters from outside Algiers entering the capital to boost numbers at the anti-regime rallies.
The tougher line on protests came just days after interim president Abdelkader Bensalah announced a December 12 date for a presidential election to fill the vacuum left by Bouteflika's departure.
The army chief has led the push for polls by the end of 2019, despite mass protests demanding political reforms and the removal of the former president's loyalists -- including Gaid Salah himself -- before any vote.
In the runup to the latest rally, as on previous Fridays, police made several arrests near the square, AFP photographers said.
Police stopped vehicles on main streets in the capital and an AFP journalist saw officers in plainclothes ask for identity papers, before some were led off to nearby vans.
As a police helicopter scoured the skies, security forces also stopped cars headed towards the city centre from its southwest entrance, where a dozen anti-riot police vans were stationed.
Said Salhi, deputy head of the Algerian League for the Defence of Human Rights, condemned the heightened security measures as "illegal".
Demonstrations have officially been banned in Algiers since 2001 but the prohibition had been ignored since rallies started on February 22 against the ailing Bouteflika's bid for a fifth presidential term.