BMW partners Jaguar Land Rover to develop electric engine

A BMW I3 electric car charges its battery outside the BMW factory in Leipzig, Germany. (Getty Images)
Updated 05 June 2019

BMW partners Jaguar Land Rover to develop electric engine

  • A joint team will be based in Munich and tasked with developing the next generation electric drive units which BMW will launch together with JLR
  • Like many other traditional carmakers, both BMW and JLR are racing to catch up with US tech giant Tesla which has a head-start in making the cleaner, smarter vehicles of the future

BERLIN: German high-end car giant BMW and British group Jaguar Land Rover announced Wednesday they are teaming up to develop a new generation of electric motors.
A joint team will be based in Munich and tasked with developing the “next generation electric drive units” which BMW will launch together with JLR.
“Cooperation between car manufacturers to share know-how and resources is important” as the automotive industry tackles “the significant technological challenges” posed by the electric cars of the future, said BMW in a statement.
The partnership is for research and development and the engines will be produced “by each partner in their own manufacturing facilities,” BMW said in a statement.
Both groups hope the partnership will reduce development costs at a time when the transition to electric vehicles weighs heavily on manufacturers’ balance sheets.
Like many other traditional carmakers, both BMW and JLR are racing to catch up with US tech giant Tesla which has a head-start in making the cleaner, smarter vehicles of the future.
Pressure is also coming from the EU for the European automotive industry to shift gears to electric engines, as new tougher CO2 emissions limits come into force from 2020.
To meet the high costs shifting away from internal combustion engines, other carmakers have also struck up partnerships.
Mercedes-Benz maker Daimler and Chinese auto giant Geely in March announced plans to develop the next generation of electric Smart cars to be made in China in a joint venture.
JLR last year unveiled an electric Jaguar SUV and is currently carrying out major restructuring in a bid to save £2.5 billion ($3.2 billion, 2.8 billion euros) so as to be able to invest more in electric cars.


China's aviation regulator raised concerns with Boeing on 737 MAX design changes

Updated 12 December 2019

China's aviation regulator raised concerns with Boeing on 737 MAX design changes

  • China is reviewing the airworthiness of the plane
  • China was first country to ground plane in March

BEIJING: China’s aviation regulator raised “important concerns” with Boeing Co. on the reliability and security of design changes to the grounded 737 MAX, it said on Thursday, but declined to comment on when the plane might fly again in China.
China is reviewing the airworthiness of the plane based on proposed changes to software and flight control systems according to a bilateral agreement with the United States, Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) spokesman Liu Luxu told reporters at a monthly briefing.
He reiterated that for the plane to resume flights in China, it needed to be re-certified, pilots needed comprehensive and effective training to restore confidence in the model and the causes of two crashes that killed 346 people needed to be investigated with effective measures put in place to prevent another one.
China was the first country to ground the 737 MAX after the second crash in Ethiopia in March and had set up a task force to review design changes to the aircraft that Boeing had submitted.
The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will not allow the 737 MAX to resume flying before the end of 2019, its chief, Steve Dickson, said on Wednesday.
Once the FAA approves the reintroduction into service, the 737 MAX can operate in the United States, but individual regulators could keep the planes grounded in other countries until they complete their own reviews.
“Due to the trade war, the jury is still out on when China would reintroduce the aircraft,” said Rob Morris, Global Head of Consultancy at Ascend by Cirium.
Chinese airlines had 97 737 MAX jets in operation before the global grounding, the most of any country, according to Cirium Fleets Analyzer.