BMW partners Jaguar Land Rover to develop electric engine

A BMW I3 electric car charges its battery outside the BMW factory in Leipzig, Germany. (Getty Images)
Updated 05 June 2019

BMW partners Jaguar Land Rover to develop electric engine

  • A joint team will be based in Munich and tasked with developing the next generation electric drive units which BMW will launch together with JLR
  • Like many other traditional carmakers, both BMW and JLR are racing to catch up with US tech giant Tesla which has a head-start in making the cleaner, smarter vehicles of the future

BERLIN: German high-end car giant BMW and British group Jaguar Land Rover announced Wednesday they are teaming up to develop a new generation of electric motors.
A joint team will be based in Munich and tasked with developing the “next generation electric drive units” which BMW will launch together with JLR.
“Cooperation between car manufacturers to share know-how and resources is important” as the automotive industry tackles “the significant technological challenges” posed by the electric cars of the future, said BMW in a statement.
The partnership is for research and development and the engines will be produced “by each partner in their own manufacturing facilities,” BMW said in a statement.
Both groups hope the partnership will reduce development costs at a time when the transition to electric vehicles weighs heavily on manufacturers’ balance sheets.
Like many other traditional carmakers, both BMW and JLR are racing to catch up with US tech giant Tesla which has a head-start in making the cleaner, smarter vehicles of the future.
Pressure is also coming from the EU for the European automotive industry to shift gears to electric engines, as new tougher CO2 emissions limits come into force from 2020.
To meet the high costs shifting away from internal combustion engines, other carmakers have also struck up partnerships.
Mercedes-Benz maker Daimler and Chinese auto giant Geely in March announced plans to develop the next generation of electric Smart cars to be made in China in a joint venture.
JLR last year unveiled an electric Jaguar SUV and is currently carrying out major restructuring in a bid to save £2.5 billion ($3.2 billion, 2.8 billion euros) so as to be able to invest more in electric cars.


Hong Kong airport transit from June 1 excludes mainland flights: Cathay Pacific

Updated 5 min 5 sec ago

Hong Kong airport transit from June 1 excludes mainland flights: Cathay Pacific

  • Transit through the airport has been barred since March 25
  • Cathay has cut capacity by around 97 percent due to a fall in demand and strict quarantine regulations

SYDNEY: Cathay Pacific Airways said on Saturday that the reopening of transit services for passengers at Hong Kong International Airport from June 1 will not include those traveling to and from mainland China.
Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam announced earlier this week that some transit passengers would be allowed through the hub from Monday, but did not provide further details. Transit through the airport has been barred since March 25 as part of measures taken to help control the spread of the coronavirus pandemic.
Cathay said travelers could transit Hong Kong if their itinerary was on a single booking and the connection time to the next flight was within eight hours.
“In this first phase, transiting to and from destinations in mainland China is not available,” the airline said on its website.
China’s aviation regulator has been flooded with tens of thousands of social media comments criticizing it and the Chinese government for the small number of flight options to bring home people stranded overseas.
The regulator drastically reduced the number of allowed international flights to prevent the potential of importing COVID-19 infections. Many foreign airlines are barred altogether and mainland carriers can fly just one weekly passenger flight on one route to any country, which has sent fares skyrocketing.
That rule does not apply to airlines from Hong Kong, such as Cathay, which are allowed more flights to and from the mainland, but the airline’s statement on Saturday indicated it cannot immediately take advantage of the boom in demand.
Cathay has cut capacity by around 97 percent due to a fall in demand and strict quarantine regulations associated with the pandemic.
Rival Asian hub Singapore, which is not allowed nearly as many mainland flights, is gradually allowing some transit traffic to resume from June 2.