Something borrowed: Online boutique for pre-worn wedding gowns launches in Dubai

New e-marketplace dresscometrue.com allows brides in the Middle East to sell their pre-loved gowns. (Supplied)
Updated 10 June 2019

Something borrowed: Online boutique for pre-worn wedding gowns launches in Dubai

  • Some of the dresses are almost 70% cheaper than their original price
  • Sellers can choose to list their dress under three different options of service

DUBAI: Brides-to-be in the Gulf often spend the lead up to their big day frantically searching for the perfect wedding dress. It’s no secret that options in the region are far from plentiful and it isn’t unheard of for brides to head abroad in the hunt for the ultimate bridal gown.

After struggling to find her own wedding dress, Dubai-based entrepreneur Eva Hachem joined forces with her husband Andy Werner to launch Dress Come True, a new platform that allows brides to shop for pre-loved wedding gowns online, with as much as 70 percent off the original retail price.

“I got married in Dubai and… I struggled to find my dream dress. I found that the prices were unreasonable and I either had to compromise on the selection or on the price,” Hachem told Arab News.

“After the wedding, I wanted to sell the dress so I picked up the phone and called boutiques and I said ‘okay, all the brides who buy from you, where do they re-sell their dress?’ They said, ‘We wish (we knew), all the brides ask us.”

The exchange sparked an idea that quickly snowballed into the new platform, one where brides can sell the “one dress you will never wear again,” while making sure it goes to someone who will cherish the gown.  

Loved-up newlyweds can list their gowns on the website for a one-time fee, with three options available. The basic package costs $22 and requires the seller to organize the delivery, while the second option allows the seller to fall back on the Dress Come True team to organize the delivery for a one-time fee of $35. Finally, for $41, sellers can avail the so-called concierge service, where the company handles all aspects of the sale.

But can brides bear to part with such an important item of clothing?

“Yesterday we talked to a bride who said something very interesting,” Hachem told Arab News. “She said, ‘I have had my dress for two years and I cherish it, but I don’t want to keep it. I never had the heart to list it next to any other item… So, when I saw the (website) and how the dresses are valued, it felt like the right place to list my dress. It has sentimental value, but you are not going to wear it again.’”


What We Are Reading Today: The Puritans: A Transatlantic History by David D. Hall

Updated 21 November 2019

What We Are Reading Today: The Puritans: A Transatlantic History by David D. Hall

This book is a sweeping transatlantic history of Puritanism from its emergence out of the religious tumult of Elizabethan England to its founding role in the story of America. 

Shedding critical new light on the diverse forms of Puritan belief and practice in England, Scotland, and New England, David Hall provides a multifaceted account of a cultural movement that judged the Protestant reforms of Elizabeth’s reign to be unfinished. Hall’s vivid and wide-ranging narrative describes the movement’s deeply ambiguous triumph under Oliver Cromwell, its political demise with the Restoration of the English monarchy in 1660, and its perilous migration across the Atlantic to establish a “perfect reformation” in the New World.

A breathtaking work of scholarship by an eminent historian, The Puritans examines the tribulations and doctrinal dilemmas that led to the fragmentation and eventual decline of Puritanism. It presents a compelling portrait of a religious and political movement that was divided virtually from the start.

In England, some wanted to dismantle the Church of England entirely and others were more cautious, while Puritans in Scotland were divided between those willing to work with a troublesome king and others insisting on the independence of the state church.