Dubai issues new financial center insolvency law after Abraaj collapse

Dubai International Financial Center (DIFC) is the largest financial hub in the Middle East, Africa and South Asia. (Courtesy of DIFC)
Updated 11 June 2019

Dubai issues new financial center insolvency law after Abraaj collapse

  • New procedures in line with global best practices introduced as a first for the region
  • The new Insolvency Law and Regulations will come into effect on Aug. 28, 2019

DUBAI: Dubai’s ruler Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum issued a new insolvency law on Tuesday for companies operating in the Dubai International Financial Center (DIFC), the largest financial hub in the Middle East, Africa and South Asia.
The new law, due to come into effect in August, has been issued following the collapse of Dubai-based private equity firm Abraaj, which had a DIFC-regulated entity Abraaj Capital.
The firm that had been the Middle East and North Africa’s biggest buyout fund unraveled after a row with some investors over the use of money in a $1 billion health care fund.
The new law introduces a “new debtor in possession bankruptcy regime” for debtors that have filed for bankruptcy but still hold assets, according to a statement on the Dubai’s ruler official website.
Abraaj, its founder Arif Naqvi and a former executive are being investigated by the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on US charges that they defrauded investors, including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
The Dubai Financial Services Authority (DFSA) said in April it was in touch with the SEC and had been investigating Abraaj Capital Ltd, an entity of the collapsed firm, over a range of matters but has not specified what they are.


Aramco chief sees demand for oil staying above 100m barrels

Updated 23 January 2020

Aramco chief sees demand for oil staying above 100m barrels

  • A panel on the global energy outlook at the WEF in Davos heard that renewable energy alone would not be able to meet rising demand for power as more people moved into the middle class
  • The panel also heard that coal, not oil, remained the biggest source of carbon emissions

DAVOS: Aramco CEO Amin Nasser said he expected global oil demand to stay above the 100 million barrels threshold as the rise of the global middle class spurred demand for energy.
A panel on the global energy outlook at the World Economic Forum in Davos heard that renewable energy alone would not be able to meet rising demand for power as more people moved into the middle class.
“There will be additional demand and the only way to meet it is if you continue to provide affordable, reliable and viable energy to the rest of the world,” said the Aramco CEO.
“There is good penetration from renewables and electric cars are picking up however you need to consider what is happening in the world. There are still an additional 2 billion people coming. There are currently 3 billion people using biomass, animal dung, kerosene for cooking and there are 1 billion people today without electricity and almost 50 percent of people have never flown in an aeroplane.”
The panel heard that coal, not oil, remained the biggest source of carbon emissions but that the location of many coal-fired power plants in developing Asian economies meant that reducing its impact was a major challenge.
“The number one source of emissions by far is the coal fire power plants – they alone are responsible for one third of emissions,” said International Energy Agency Executive Director Fatih Birol. “But they are in many cases the number one source of electricity generation in low income countries - so this is not a black and white issue.”