India set to raise tariffs on some US goods

US goods and services trade with India stood at an estimated $142.1 billion in 2018. (File/AFP)
Updated 15 June 2019

India set to raise tariffs on some US goods

  • The government had said last June it would raise import taxes on a slew of US goods including almonds and apples
  • It delayed raising tariffs several times as trade talks between the world’s two biggest democracies raised hopes of a resolution

NEW DELHI: India has decided to raise tariffs on imports of 29 goods from the US after having deferred the move several times since announcing it last year, media reported Saturday.
The government had said last June it would raise import taxes on a slew of US goods including almonds and apples, apparently irked by Washington’s refusal to exempt New Delhi from higher steel and aluminum tariffs.
But it delayed raising tariffs several times as trade talks between the world’s two biggest democracies raised hopes of a resolution.
However President Donald Trump’s decision to strip New Delhi of its preferential trade status earlier this month appears to have triggered the latest Indian move.
There would be no further delays in imposing the retaliatory tariffs, the Economic Times reported, quoting a government official, with the new taxes due to take effect from Sunday.
The Press Trust of India news agency said the finance ministry would make a formal announcement soon, although it had already conveyed its decision to the United States.
The trade tensions come despite Washington’s effort to boost ties with India as a counterweight to China and Trump’s stated good relations with Prime Minister Narendra Modi.
Trump and Modi are set to meet at the G20 summit on June 28-29 in Osaka where the sticky trade issue is likely to be taken up.
It is also likely to figure during talks with US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo who is set to visit India for talks later this month.
On Wednesday Pompeo had said the US was open to dialogue with India and would “broach some tough topics.”
US goods and services trade with India stood at an estimated $142.1 billion in 2018. The US trade deficit with India was $24.2 billion, according to official data.
Washington is already engaged in a full-blown trade war with India’s regional rival China.


Samsung chairman Lee Kun-hee, head of South Korea’s biggest conglomerate, dies at 78

Updated 25 October 2020

Samsung chairman Lee Kun-hee, head of South Korea’s biggest conglomerate, dies at 78

  • During his lifetime, Samsung Electronics developed from a second-tier TV maker to the world’s biggest technology firm by revenue

SEOUL: Lee Kun-hee, the charismatic leader of Samsung Group, South Korea’s biggest conglomerate, died on Sunday, the company said, six years he was hospitalized for a heart attack.
Lee, who was 78, helped grow his father Lee Byung-chull’s noodle trading business into a sprawling powerhouse with assets worth some $375 billion, with dozens of affiliates stretching from electronics and insurance to shipbuilding and construction.
“Lee is such a symbolic figure in South Korea’s spectacular rise and how South Korea embraced globalization, that his death will be remembered by so many Koreans,” said Chung Sun Sup, chief executive officer of corporate researcher firm Chaebul.com.
He is the latest second-generation leader of a South Korean family-controlled conglomerate to die, leaving potentially thorny succession issues for the third generation.
Lee’s son Jay Y. Lee has been embroiled in legal troubles linked to a merger of two Samsung affiliates that helped Lee assume greater control of the group’s flagship Samsung Electronics.
The younger Lee served jail time in his role in a bribery scandal that triggered the impeachment of then-President Park Geun-hye. He is facing a retrial over the case, and a separate trial on charges of accounting fraud and stock price manipulation kicked off this week.
The death of Lee, South Korea’s richest with a net worth of $20.9 billion according to Forbes, is set to prompt investor interest in a potential restructuring of the group involving his stakes in key Samsung companies such as Samsung Life and Samsung Electronics.
Samsung Life is the biggest shareholder of the group’s crown jewel Samsung Electronics, and Lee owns 20.76% of the insurance firm.
Lee died with his family by his side, including Jay Y. Lee, the Samsung Electronics vice chairman, the conglomerate said.
“Chairman Lee was a true visionary who transformed Samsung into the world-leading innovator and industrial powerhouse from a local business. His 1993 declaration of ‘New Management’ was the motivating driver of the company’s vision to deliver the best technology to help advance global society,” Samsung said in a statement.
During his lifetime, Samsung Electronics developed from a second-tier TV maker to the world’s biggest technology firm by revenue — seeing off Japanese brands Sony, Sharp Corp. and Panasonic Corp. in chips, TVs and displays; ending Nokia Oyj’s handset supremacy and beating Apple Inc. in smartphones.
“His legacy will be everlasting,” Samsung said.
Chung at Chaebul.com said, “Immediate attention will be given to the roughly 5% stake Lee has in Samsung Electronics,” and how this will be distributed to his family.