Film Review: Movie master’s reflective study of ageing film director low on energy in ‘Pain and Glory’

Updated 16 June 2019

Film Review: Movie master’s reflective study of ageing film director low on energy in ‘Pain and Glory’

CANNES: One of the most arresting qualities of movie masters such as Pedro Almodovar and Emir Kusturica is their boundless energy. But lose it, and film fans soon notice something is amiss.

While Serbian legend Kusturica still manages to keep his cinema bubbling with life, Spain’s Almodovar – pushing 70 years old and somewhat bogged down by physical ailments – appears to have taken his foot of the pedal in his latest outing, “Pain and Glory.”

The drama, about a film director reflecting on the choices he has made in life as past and present come crashing down around him, competed for the Cannes Palme d’Or and won best actor award for its hero, Antonio Banderas. The Spanish star is an alter ego of Almodovar himself – much like Indian actor Soumitra Chatterjee was of Satyajit Ray.

“Pain and Glory” is a vaguely disguised autobiography of Almodovar, revealing the anxieties rather than glories of the auteur’s chequered career.

His earlier works, such as “All About My Mother,” “Volver” and “Julieta,” were fantastic studies of Spanish society narrated with unbelievable vigor. Who can forget the opening scene of “Volver” in which dozens of widows, including Penelope Cruz’s character, are seen cleaning their husbands’ graves on a windswept morning?

“Pain and Glory” lacks this dynamism and is mostly ruminative.

Banderas plays film director, Salvador Mallo, a step-down role from his usual dashing screen image. Mallo has not made any movies for years but has enough money to lead a comfortable life surrounded by expensive artefacts.

However, he suffers with depression and worries about his headaches, back pain and a tendency to choke on his food. But a chance meeting with old acting friend Zulema (Cecilia Roth), leads Mallo to get in touch again with film star, Alberto Crespo (Asier Etxeandia), after the two had fallen out during a shoot.

When Crespo introduces Mallo to heroin, he remembers an old script titled “Addiction” and asks Crespo to perform it on stage. In doing so, Mallo opens the curtain on a new life.

In a way, “Pain and Glory” talks about how to come to terms with death, but it is also witty and about lovers and mothers.

Almodovar is such a master craftsman that he does not allow his work to sink into self-indulgence. It is a movie within a movie, and a dream that leads to another.

Most importantly, Almodovar could not have found a better actor than Banderas, who transforms splendidly into Mallo.


Numbers prove Bella Hadid is world’s most beautiful

Bella Hadid has been declared the most beautiful woman in the world on the basis of an ancient Greek equation that measures beauty. (AFP)
Updated 18 October 2019

Numbers prove Bella Hadid is world’s most beautiful

DUBAI: US-Palestinian model Bella Hadid has been declared the most beautiful woman in the world on the basis of an ancient Greek equation that measures beauty.

London-based cosmetic surgeon Julian De Silva made the claim using the so-called “golden ratio of beauty,” which found Hadid’s facial features to be 94.35 percent symmetric.

“Her eyes, eyebrows, nose, lips, chin, jaw and facial shape were measured and came closest to the ancient Greeks’ idea of perfection,” the surgeon wrote on his Instagram account.

“The golden ratio was a mathematical equation devised by the Greeks in an attempt to measure beauty,” he explained.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Golden Ratio of Beauty Phi 2/10 #jdsgoldenratio @beyonce - 92.44% Beyoncé came in second place as she scored highly on her forehead and brow area. She looks incredible as she approaches her 40s. She had a near perfect score for her face shape. How is the Golden Ratio of Beauty Phi measured? The Golden Ratio of Beauty Phi originates from the European Renaissance. Artists and Architects used an equation - known as the Golden Ratio - as an aid during the creation of their masterpieces. Scientists have since adapted the mathematical formula to explain what makes a person beautiful. The length and the width of someone's face is measured and then the results are divided. According to the Golden Ratio, the ideal result is roughly 1.6. Measurements are then taken from the forehead hairline to the spot between the eyes, from the spot between the eyes and the bottom of the nose and from the bottom of the nose to the bottom of the chin. A person is considered to be more beautiful if the numbers are equal. Attention is then given to the symmetry and proportion of the face. To be deemed 'beautiful' according to the Golden Ratio, the length of the ear must be equal to the length of the nose and the width of an eye should be equal to the distance between the eyes. #news#beauty#plasticsurgery#harleystreet#beautifacation#beautifulfaces#jdsgoldenratio

A post shared by Dr. Julian De Silva MD MBBS (@drjuliandesilva) on

The US singer Beyonce was ranked second with a 92.44 percent symmetry reading.