Sudan’s Bashir charged on corruption in first public appearance since removal

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Sudan's ex-president Omar al-Bashir leaves the office of the anti-corruption prosecutor in Khartoum, Sudan, June 16, 2019. (Reuters)
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Sudan's ex-president Omar al-Bashir leaves the office of the anti-corruption prosecutor in Khartoum, Sudan, June 16, 2019. (Reuters)
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Sudan's ousted president Omar al-Bashir is escorted into a vehicle as he returns to prison following his appearance before prosecutors over charges of corruption and illegal possession of foreign currency, in the capital Khartoum on June 16, 2019. ( AFP)
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Sudan's ex-president Omar Al-Bashir leaves the office of the anti-corruption prosecutor in Khartoum, Sudan, June 16, 2019. (Reuters)
Updated 17 June 2019

Sudan’s Bashir charged on corruption in first public appearance since removal

  • Al-Bashir appeared in public on Sunday for the first time since his removal by the army on April 11
  • Dressed in a white traditional robe and turban, was transported in a heavily armed convoy from the capital's Kober prison

KHARTOUM: Sudan’s ousted leader Omar Al-Bashir was charged with corruption on Sunday, minutes after he appeared in public for the first time since he was removed from office.

The former president was driven to the prosecutor’s office in Khartoum then walked briskly into the building, smiling and speaking with the guards escorting him.

Later he walked out scowling after prosecutors read out the charges he faces — money laundering and the illegal possession of large amounts of foreign currency. Bashir is also accused of accepting unauthorized gifts.

 

The charges relate in part to several million dollars worth of cash in US dollars, euros and Sudanese pounds found in Bashir’s home a week after the military ousted him on April 11 following weeks of protests against his 30-year rule.

Meanwhile, the deputy head of Sudan’s ruling military council said demands from protest leaders for immediate civilian government may not be acceptable.

Gen. Mohammed Hamdan Dagalo, known as Hemedti, said a transitional administration with a majority of protest movement leaders would be a problem because it would not come as a result of elections.

“Our problem is a non-elected legislative body that would root out all of us,” he said.

 

 

 

 


Algerian court jails protesters over election

Updated 19 November 2019

Algerian court jails protesters over election

ALGIERS: An Algerian court has jailed four protesters for 18 months for disrupting a candidate’s campaign for the Dec. 12 presidential election which is opposed by a mass protest movement.
The court sentenced the four on Monday after protests on Sunday in the western city of Tlemcen, where one of the five candidates, Ali Benflis, was campaigning. No details were available on what their exact actions were.
Algeria’s authorities are trying to quell a protest movement that erupted in February to demand the departure of the country’s ruling hierarchy, an end to corruption and the army’s withdrawal from politics.
The army, which has emerged as the most powerful institution in the country, has pushed for next month’s election as a means to end the protests and restore normality. The former president, Abdelaziz Bouteflika, quit in April.
The judgment comes a week after a series of other prison sentences were handed down to protesters who had raised flags with Berber symbols during earlier demonstrations.
Several opposition leaders have also been held during the protests, and charged with contributing to damaging army morale.
However, the authorities have also detained numerous current and former senior officials on corruption charges, and have jailed some of them including the once untouchable former intelligence chief.
The protesters have rejected any presidential election carried out now, saying the continued presence of Bouteflika allies in the upper echelons of the government mean it cannot be free or fair.
Human Rights Watch said last week that the arrest of scores of protesters looked like “part of a pattern of trying to weaken opposition to Algeria’s interim rulers and their determination to hold presidential elections.”