Wife of former Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn seeks US President Donald Trump’s help

Carole Ghosn, right, is seeking US President Donald Trump’s intervention to press Japan for ‘fair trial conditions’ for her husband former Nissan chief Carlo Ghosn. (AFP)
Updated 17 June 2019

Wife of former Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn seeks US President Donald Trump’s help

  • Carlos Ghosn is awaiting trial in Japan over charges of under-reporting his salary for years while at Nissan

LONDON: The wife of ex-Nissan chief Carlos Ghosn on Monday reached out to US President Donald Trump, asking him to press Japan at upcoming talks about “fair trial conditions.”
Carlos Ghosn is awaiting trial in Japan over charges of under-reporting his salary for years while at Nissan and using company funds for personal expenses. The 65-year-old denies the accusations.
“World leaders are going to be meeting at the G20 at the end of the month,” Carole Ghosn told the BBC in an interview broadcast on Monday.
“I’d like President Trump to speak to Prime Minister (Shinzo) Abe about fair conditions, fair trial conditions, and to let me speak to my husband — and also to respect this presumption of innocence until proven guilty.”
She added that the last time she saw her husband was on April 4 when prosecutors stormed their apartment in the early hours.
Carlos Ghosn, who is a French citizen, was freed in Japan on $4.5 million bail in April after being detained on fresh charges but is living under strict conditions including restrictions on seeing his wife.
Under those bail conditions, Ghosn must stay in Japan and live in a court-appointed residence with cameras to monitor his movements.
“I think all of this could have been dealt with internally within the company. This didn’t need to go this far,” Carole Ghosn added on Monday.
“On top of this, my husband is innocent and time will prove the truth.”
This year’s G20 summit will be held in the Japanese city of Osaka from June 28-29.


Britain must accept EU standards if it wants full market access: Germany’s Maas

Updated 29 January 2020

Britain must accept EU standards if it wants full market access: Germany’s Maas

  • ‘By the end of the year, we need to be clear on the shape of our relationship’
  • Referring to the Beatles song “Hello, goodbye,” Maas said that both sides had sorted out the goodbye

BERLIN: Britain will have to compromise on issues such as consumer rights and environment protection if it wants to maintain full access to the European Union’s single market, German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said on Wednesday.
“By the end of the year, we need to be clear on the shape of our relationship,” Maas wrote in a guest article in German weekly Die Zeit in reference to the post-Brexit transition period.
“So let me say very openly: Yes, we all want zero tariffs and zero trade barriers, but that also means zero dumping and zero unfair competition. Without similar standards to protect our workers, our consumers and the environment, there can be no full access to the largest single market in the world.”
Britain and the European Union will therefore have to conduct the negotiations on their post-Brexit economic relations in a way that “won’t harm the European Union,” Maas said.
Turning to security and defense policies, the minister said that Britain and the EU needed to develop new forms of cooperation, for example by creating a European Security Council.
Such a council could help coordinate joint positions on strategic issues of European security and to respond more quickly to international crises. “We are working with France to flesh out this idea as quickly as possible in order to build a foundation for our future relationship,” Maas wrote.
The German minister also suggested that the EU’s door would always remain open for Britain to come back.
Referring to the Beatles song “Hello, goodbye,” Maas said that both sides had sorted out the goodbye.
“But should this farewell ever turn out to be less final than anticipated, rest assured that we will always have a place for you at our table in Brussels and in our hearts,” he added.