Ireland to ban sales of new petrol and diesel cars by 2030

The “Climate Action Plan” also includes the elimination of non-recyclable plastic and higher fees on the production of materials that are difficult to recycle. (File/AFP)
Updated 18 June 2019

Ireland to ban sales of new petrol and diesel cars by 2030

  • The government hopes to have 950,000 electric vehicles on Irish roads by 2030
  • The bigger goal is to put Ireland on a path to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050

LONDON: Ireland has announced it will ban the sale of new petrol and diesel vehicles by 2030 as part of its new climate change plan.
The government hopes to have 950,000 electric vehicles on Irish roads by then, supported by a network of charging stations.
The measure is one of 180 proposals covering business, construction, transport, agriculture and waste management intended to put Ireland on a path to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050.
“Our approach will be to nudge people and businesses to change behavior and adapt new technologies through incentives, disincentives, regulations and information,” said Prime Minister Leo Varadkar.
“Our objective... is to transition to a low-carbon and climate-resilient society. Our call to action in the fight to save our planet,” he added.
Dublin hopes to increase its level of electricity generated from renewable energy from 30 percent of the total mix to 70 percent by 2030.
The “Climate Action Plan” also includes the elimination of non-recyclable plastic and higher fees on the production of materials that are difficult to recycle.
Friends of the Earth Director Oisin Coghlan called the plan “the biggest innovation in Irish climate policy in 20 years.”
But Greenpeace criticized the government for not committing to the 2050 target, only making it a goal.


Britain must accept EU standards if it wants full market access: Germany’s Maas

Updated 29 January 2020

Britain must accept EU standards if it wants full market access: Germany’s Maas

  • ‘By the end of the year, we need to be clear on the shape of our relationship’
  • Referring to the Beatles song “Hello, goodbye,” Maas said that both sides had sorted out the goodbye

BERLIN: Britain will have to compromise on issues such as consumer rights and environment protection if it wants to maintain full access to the European Union’s single market, German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said on Wednesday.
“By the end of the year, we need to be clear on the shape of our relationship,” Maas wrote in a guest article in German weekly Die Zeit in reference to the post-Brexit transition period.
“So let me say very openly: Yes, we all want zero tariffs and zero trade barriers, but that also means zero dumping and zero unfair competition. Without similar standards to protect our workers, our consumers and the environment, there can be no full access to the largest single market in the world.”
Britain and the European Union will therefore have to conduct the negotiations on their post-Brexit economic relations in a way that “won’t harm the European Union,” Maas said.
Turning to security and defense policies, the minister said that Britain and the EU needed to develop new forms of cooperation, for example by creating a European Security Council.
Such a council could help coordinate joint positions on strategic issues of European security and to respond more quickly to international crises. “We are working with France to flesh out this idea as quickly as possible in order to build a foundation for our future relationship,” Maas wrote.
The German minister also suggested that the EU’s door would always remain open for Britain to come back.
Referring to the Beatles song “Hello, goodbye,” Maas said that both sides had sorted out the goodbye.
“But should this farewell ever turn out to be less final than anticipated, rest assured that we will always have a place for you at our table in Brussels and in our hearts,” he added.