Turkish industrial output slides in April on lira weakness

Turkish manufacturing activity contracted in May, shrinking for the 14th month in a row. Above, an operative at an assembly line of the MAN Bus Production Center in Ankara. (Reuters)
Updated 18 June 2019

Turkish industrial output slides in April on lira weakness

  • Industrial production, regarded as a signal of growth data, declined in the wake of last year’s currency crisis
  • Manufacturing activity contracted in May, shrinking for the 14th month in a row due to slowing purchasing activity and moderation in new orders

ISTANBUL: Turkish industrial production fell a greater-than-expected 4 percent year-on-year in April, the Turkish Statistical Institute said on Tuesday, reflecting the impact of renewed lira weakness as the index declined for an eighth consecutive month.
Industrial production, regarded as a signal of growth data, declined in the wake of last year’s currency crisis, which caused the economy to contract annually in the last two quarters.
In a Reuters poll, the calendar-adjusted industrial output figure was forecast to fall 2.5 percent year-on-year. Month-on-month, industrial production was down 1 percent in April on a calendar and seasonally adjusted basis, the institute said.
Despite some signs of recovery in previous months, industrial output was hit by another bout of lira weakness in late March and April.
The currency has lost nearly 10 percent of its value this year, extending a 30 percent slide in 2018, fueled mainly by Ankara’s strained ties with Washington as well as uncertainty over the outcome of Istanbul mayoral election.
Confidence indices and the Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) data for March and April had signalled that the increased volatility in markets would be reflected on the real economy, said Muammer Komurcuoglu, research director at Is Investment.
“The industrial production data announced today shows the negative impact is being felt beginning in April,” he said, adding that the negative outlook is expected to continue in May. “This situation points to the continuation of the contraction of growth in the second quarter,” he said.
Turkish manufacturing activity contracted in May, shrinking for the 14th month in a row due to slowing purchasing activity and moderation in new orders, a business survey showed earlier this month. Manufacturing PMI stood at 45.3, indicating contraction.
Economic confidence tumbled 8.5 percent in May, while consumer confidence dropped to its lowest level on record.


Saudi female student pilot aims high with flying ambitions

Updated 19 November 2019

Saudi female student pilot aims high with flying ambitions

  • Amirah Al-Saif is among the first batch of 49 female students

DUBAI: Saudi women aiming to emulate Yasmeen Al-Maimani’s feat, the Kingdom’s first female commercial pilot, now have that opportunity as Oxford Aviation Academy has opened its doors for them to take flying lessons and earn their licenses.

One those women raring to earn her pilot wings is 19-year-old Amirah Al-Saif, who enrolled in the aviation academy to fulfill her dream of flying for the Kingdom’s national carrier Saudi Airlines (Saudia).

“They have been very supportive of us females,” Al-Saif, who hails from Riyadh, told Arab News at the sidelines of the Dubai Airshow, when asked about her experience at the academy.

Al-Saif is among the first batch of 49 female students, with six of them already in ground school, expected to receive their licenses by the start of 2021 after a grueling course that requires them to first learn English, Mathematics, Physics and other basic knowledge subjects.

She is also the first in the family to have an interest in the aviation industry.

Student pilot Amirah Al-Saif, right, who hails from Riyadh, is the first in the family to have an interest in the aviation industry. (Supplied)

Those who pass the foundation program can then move on to ground school for practical lessons and ideally graduate in two years with three licenses: the Private Pilot License, Instrument Rating and Commercial Pilot License.

Al-Saif considers herself lucky since she was not constrained take courses abroad for her pilot training, unlike Al-Maimani who had to leave the Kingdom to receive her license, as well as wait for a long time before being eventually hired by Nesma Airlines.

The flying school is located at the King Fahd International Airport in Dammam and is an authorized branch of Oxford Aviation Academy based in the UK.

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