Nigel Farage’s milkshake attacker told to pay him compensation

In this Sunday, May 26, 2019 file photo, Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage speaks to the media in Southampton, England. (AP)
Updated 19 June 2019

Nigel Farage’s milkshake attacker told to pay him compensation

  • Politicians in Britain have recently have been targeted by protesters who throw milkshakes

LONDON: A man who threw a milkshake over Nigel Farage, the leader of Britain’s Brexit Party, has been ordered to pay him compensation to cover his suit-cleaning bill after pleading guilty to common assault and criminal damage.
Paul Crowther, 32, threw the milkshake over Farage, one of the leading figures in the campaign for Britain to leave the European Union, at an event in the northern English city of Newcastle before the European elections last month.
Crowther, who lost his job after the incident, was ordered to pay Farage 350 pounds ($438) in compensation to cover the cost of damage to a lapel microphone and his suit cleaning. He was also ordered to do 150 hours of unpaid work.
Farage’s newly-formed pro-Brexit Party won the most support in Britain’s European elections last month with a promise to take the country out of the European Union without a deal.
Crowther, who was arrested after the incident, told journalists at the time the act was “a right of protest against people like him.”
Chris Atkinson, a lawyer for Crown Prosecution Service, said politicians should be free to conduct legitimate campaigns without fear of physical assault.
“While members of the public have the democratic right to engage in peaceful protest, it is wholly appropriate to bring charges in any case where such protests cross the line into criminal behavior.”
Politicians in Britain have recently have been targeted by protesters who throw milkshakes.


Sheep take over streets of Madrid for annual migration

Updated 20 October 2019

Sheep take over streets of Madrid for annual migration

  • The annual event, which started in 1994, allows shepherds to exercise their right to use traditional routes to migrate their livestock
  • The herd includes 2,000 merino sheep and 100 goats

MADRID: Sheep replaced traffic on the streets of Madrid on Sunday as shepherds steered their flocks through the heart of the Spanish capital, following ancient migration routes.
The annual event, which started in 1994, allows shepherds to exercise their right to use traditional routes to migrate their livestock from northern Spain to more southerly pastures for winter grazing.
The route would have taken them through undeveloped countryside a few centuries ago, but today it cuts through Madrid’s bustling city center and along some of its most famous streets.
Sheep farmers pay a nominal charge in symbolic acknowledgement of a 1418 agreement with the city council that set a fee of 50 maravedis — medieval coins — per 1,000 sheep brought through the central Sol square and Gran Via street.
The herd includes 2,000 merino sheep and 100 goats.