ICC prosecutor calls on Sudan authorities to hand over Omar Al-Bashir

Former Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir addressing parliament earlier this year before his overthrow. (AFP/File photo)
Updated 19 June 2019

ICC prosecutor calls on Sudan authorities to hand over Omar Al-Bashir

  • ICC chief prosecutor tells the UN Security Council she is ready to work with authorities to ensure Darfur suspects face justice
  • Council members in calling for an end to violence against civilians

UNITED NATIONS: The chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Court urged Sudan’s transitional authorities on Wednesday to hand over or prosecute ousted President Omar Al-Bashir and four others for alleged war crimes in Darfur.
Fatou Bensouda told the UN Security Council she is ready to work with authorities “to ensure that the Darfur suspects face independent and impartial justice” either at the ICC in The Hague, Netherlands, or in Sudan if its court meets international standards.
Bensouda said she didn’t underestimate “the complexity and fluidity of the events unfolding in Sudan,” but declared it was now time to act and ensure that the ICC suspects face justice.
Negotiations on Sudan’s transition following Al-Bashir’s ouster in April collapsed after a violent crackdown on a protest camp in the capital Khartoum by security forces. Protesters demanding civilian rule say at least 128 people have been killed across the country since security forces moved in to clear the sit-in area outside the military’s headquarters on June 3. Authorities put the death toll at 61, including three from security forces.
Bensouda joined many council members in calling for an end to violence against civilians, including alleged sexual and gender-based crimes, which has spread beyond Khartoum to other regions, including Darfur.
“As for Sudan itself, it is now at a crossroads with the opportunity to depart from its previous policy of complete non-cooperation with my office and embark on a new chapter by signaling a new commitment to accountability for the victims in the Darfur situation,” she said.
Sudan is not a party to the ICC and Al-Bashir’s government refused to recognize its jurisdiction. Sudanese minister Elsadig Ali Ahmed told the council Wednesday that “despite the change of the political situation in Sudan ... our position remains the same, unchanged.”
He told the council that Sudan has begun “the pursuit of a civilian democratic rule where there is no room for impunity,” and the new political reality “will undoubtedly lead to the establishment of a regime where freedom and democracy and the rule of law prevail.”
For Sudan, he emphasized “that combating impunity is a noble purpose of justice ... and it primarily falls within the responsibilities of the national judiciary.” He called the ICC principle mentioned by Bensouda of letting national governments prosecute war crimes if their courts meet the right standards “positive.”
Al-Bashir appeared in public for the first time Sunday when he was led to a prosecutor’s office in a corruption investigation.
Ahmed said it has been announced that Al-Bashir’s trial will begin next week, and he said the public prosecutor is also investigating two other detainees sought by the ICC, Abdel Raheem Hussein and Ahmad Harun.
A judicial official with the prosecutor’s office said Al-Bashir was questioned over accusations that include money laundering and the possession of large amounts of foreign currency. He said the probe partly related to millions of dollars’ worth of cash in US dollars, euros and Sudanese pounds that were found in Al-Bashir’s home a week after his ouster.
Bensouda noted that the transitional military council now ruling Sudan made a commitment in its inaugural address on April 11 to all local, regional and international treaties, charters and conventions.
She said this pledge must including a commitment to the UN Charter, which requires Sudan to comply with Security Council resolutions — including the 2005 resolution that referred the situation in Darfur to the ICC.
The vast western Darfur region of Sudan was gripped by bloodshed in 2003 when rebels took up arms against the government in Khartoum, accusing it of discrimination and neglect. The government was accused of retaliating by arming local nomadic Arab tribes known as the janjaweed and unleashing them on civilian populations — a charge it denies.
Bensouda said Sudan has a legal obligation to surrender the suspects in custody or prosecute them on charges in ICC warrants — including genocide allegations against Al-Bashir — and to surrender two others still at large, senior janjaweed commander Ali Kushayb and Abdallah Banda, commander of the Justice and Equality rebel group. She stressed that this must include safe and unfettered access for ICC staff to Sudan and Darfur.
Elize Keppler, associate director for Human Rights Watch’s international justice program, said the situation in Sudan has changed and the new authority “has the opportunity to meet Sudan’s international legal obligations to surrender Omar Al-Bashir and the other suspects to face justice at the ICC as the Darfur victims so deserve more than 10 years later.”


Innovation, cooperation key to GCC’s economic vitality

The speakers underscored the need for GCC countries to strengthen their economies by continuing to invest in health care and education. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 50 min 17 sec ago

Innovation, cooperation key to GCC’s economic vitality

  • Abu Dhabi Strategic Debate features discussions on pressing geopolitical issues

ABU DHABI: The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) could become the sixth-largest economic power in the world by 2030 if it can maintain the same pace of growth and development, according to a senior Bahraini official. Dr. Abdulla bin Ahmed Al-Khalifa, chairman of the Bahrain Center for Strategic, International and Energy Studies (DERASAT), made the remark while speaking at the Abu Dhabi Strategic Debate (ADSD) on Monday.
With “Old Power Competition in the New Age” as its theme, the conference has featured an impressive lineup of speakers. The topics for the second and final day were broadly “Power distribution in the Gulf region” and “Repercussions of conflicts on the future of Arab states.”
Al-Khalifa underscored the need for GCC countries to strengthen their economies by continuing to invest in health care and education and boosting the quality of human resources.
On the subject of regional tensions, Al-Khalifa had three likely scenarios, starting with one in which Gulf states become a united political bloc that serves as a “regional center for innovation, entrepreneurship, cooperation and sustainable development.” In the second scenario, a dire fate awaits the region, with terrorism and unrest prevailing over the forces of social and economic stability.
An equally worse-case scenario sees a “static” future, with the GCC region condemned to a prolonged period of unrest and constant interference by regional and global powers in their affairs.
Similar apprehensions were expressed by Mahmoud Jibril, a former prime minister of Libya and president of the National Forces’ Alliance, during a separate panel discussion, “Middle East Power Distribution: Hard, Soft and Artificial.”
Arguing that Israel has emerged as “the main winner” in Middle East conflicts, Jibril blamed the Arab world for not moving in step with “the trends of this era.”

HIGHLIGHT

With ‘Old Power Competition in the New Age’ as its theme, the conference has featured an impressive line-up of speakers.

He said that Israel was the recipient of 21 percent of international investments by technology giants such as Apple, Microsoft and Amazon in their research and development centers.
“Investment channeled to Israel is 200 times as a proportion of the country’s population. These are its source of power,” Jibril said. By contrast, he said, the Arab world has one of the highest budgets for military acquisitions and yet its security environment keeps deteriorating.
Jibril identified three forces that he said are shaping modern history. The first is technologies such as AI (artificial intelligence) and digitalization. The second is youth, which he described as a “game changer” in the region. The third force, according to Jibril, is climate change.
“In the coming years, cities will disappear because of rising temperatures and economies will collapse due to expanding desertification,” he said. “The consequences will be migration and conflict. Unfortunately, these three forces cannot be reversed. At best, their impacts can be mitigated.”
Earlier in the day, Dr. Ebtesam Al-Ketbi, president of the Emirates Policy Center, the ADSD’s organizer, said that the Gulf region is witnessing “fierce competition among states over power redistribution.”
While the region’s security and stability will continue to be among the primary challenges, change will come once a deal with Iran is reached, she said.
“Iran doesn’t have anything to lose at the level of infrastructure,” El-Ketbi said.
“If a missile hits Iran, the country will not lose much but if a missile hits Aramco from Iran, there is a lot to lose.”
Al-Ketbi said that a balance of hard and soft power is crucial for achieving stability in the region. “Having hard power alone leads to wars and acts of sabotage,” she said, evidently alluding to recent incidents in the Gulf, while “possession of soft power alone is not enough for achieving security, especially for the GCC countries.”