Saudi, Yemeni special forces capture leader of Daesh in Yemen

Saudi, Yemeni special forces capture leader of Daesh in Yemen
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The leader, Abu Osama Al-Muhajir, as well as other members of the organization including its chief financial officer, were captured on June 3 in a raid on a house carried out by Saudi and Yemeni forces. (SPA)
Saudi, Yemeni special forces capture leader of Daesh in Yemen
2 / 3
The leader, Abu Osama Al-Muhajir, as well as other members of the organization including its chief financial officer, were captured on June 3 in a raid on a house carried out by Saudi and Yemeni forces. (SPA)
Saudi, Yemeni special forces capture leader of Daesh in Yemen
3 / 3
The leader, Abu Osama Al-Muhajir, as well as other members of the organization including its chief financial officer, were captured on June 3 in a raid on a house carried out by Saudi and Yemeni forces. (SPA)
Updated 26 June 2019

Saudi, Yemeni special forces capture leader of Daesh in Yemen

Saudi, Yemeni special forces capture leader of Daesh in Yemen
  • Weapons, ammunition and telecommunication devices were also seized during the 10-minute operation
  • There were no injuries to civilians, including 3 women and 3 children who were inside the house

RIYADH: Saudi and Yemeni special forces captured the leader of Daesh in Yemen, the Arab coalition said Tuesday.
Abu Osama Al-Muhajir was seized during an operation on June 3 along with a Daesh financial officer and a number of other members of the organization, the Saudi Press Agency reported.
The arrests were made at a house that had been under surveillance, coalition spokesman Col. Turki Al-Maliki said. Three women and three children were in the house at the time.
The operation took 10 minutes and the women and children were unharmed.

The statement did not specify where in Yemen the raid took place.
“The operation was successful in capturing the terrorists and ensuring the safety of the women and children inside the house,” Col. Al Malki said.
The forces recovered a number of weapons, ammunition, laptops and computers, money in different currencies, and communications equipment.

Extremist groups like Al-Qaeda and Daesh have attempted to take advantage of the conflict in Yemen and assert their authority in some areas of the country — particularly in the south.
The Arab coalition, which includes Saudi Arabia and the UAE, is fighting in support of the official government against the Iran-backed Houthi militia that seized the capital Sanaa in 2014. But the coalition has also been working with Yemeni forces to combat extremist groups in the south.
“This operation is an extension of the close cooperation between the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the Yemeni government to combat terrorism and dismantle the terrorist organizations,” Al-Maliki said. “It is also a painful blow to the terrorist Daesh organization, especially in Yemen, and it follows the Kingdom’s efforts to combat terrorism in all its forms.”

SaudiArabia's Deputy Defense Minister Prince Khalid bin Salman said the Kingdom's military operations in Yemen are aimed at preventing terrorist groups like Al-Qaeda, Daesh and the Houthis from using the country to destabilize the region.

"The capture of ISIS's leader in Yemen is just the latest example of our commitment to eradicating the scourge of terrorism," Prince Khalid said on Twitter. "Saudi Arabia continues to play a leading role in the international community’s effort to combat terrorism and counter extremism."

Saudi Arabia's Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Adel Al-Jubeir said the operation was "another testament of the Kingdom’s unwavering commitment to confront all forces of terrorism and extremism."

 

 

 


Patients die at home as Lebanese oxygen supplies run low

Patients die at home as Lebanese oxygen supplies run low
Lebanese soldiers patrol as they try to enforce a total lockdown in the southern suburbs of Beirut as a measure against the COVID-19 pandemic. (AFP)
Updated 37 min 48 sec ago

Patients die at home as Lebanese oxygen supplies run low

Patients die at home as Lebanese oxygen supplies run low
  • Hospitals are running out of space and supplies as infections continue to rise
  • All the beds designated for COVID-19 patients in hospitals are occupied, as well as in emergency departments, and there are dozens of patients moving from one hospital to another in search of a bed

BEIRUT: Many doctors specializing in bacterial and infectious diseases expect a further jump in the number of people of infected with COVID-19 next week in Lebanon with hospitals exceeding their capacity.

On Sunday, the total number of laboratory-confirmed infections exceeded a quarter of a million people in the country.

In the first 17 days of the year 67,655 new cases were recorded, and the lockdown period is expected to be extended for at least 10 more days.

Suleiman Haroun, head of the Lebanese Syndicate of Private Hospitals, said: “The epidemiological scene in Lebanon reflects part of the reality, not all of it. The real situation will be worse yet.”

He said: “All the beds designated for COVID-19 patients in hospitals are occupied, as well as in emergency departments, and there are dozens of patients moving from one hospital to another in search of a bed. Hospitals have exceeded their capacity.”

Pulmonologist and intensive care specialist Dr. Wael Jaroush said: “I have never seen anything like what I see in the hospitals now. I never imagined that I would ever go through such an experience. There is no room for patients in the emergency departments.

“They are dying in their homes. Some of them are begging to buy oxygen generators, new or second hand.

“The price of a new one is normally $700, yet people are selling used devices for about $5,000, and some patients are forced to buy them in foreign currency, meaning that the patient’s family buy the dollar on the black market for more than LBP8,000.”

Jaroush said that patients were infected with the virus because of mixing with other people at the end of last year and in the first 10 days of January. He expected that their number would increase during Monday and Tuesday. He would wait to see if the numbers declined on Wednesday and Thursday.

He said that 10-liter oxygen bottles and smaller ones are out of stock “because of the high demand on them, either for storage due to lack of confidence in the state, or because they are not available in hospitals.”

“As a doctor, I come across patients who tell me that they bought the oxygen bottle two months ago, for example, and put it in their homes, just as they did when they resorted to storing medicines.”

He pointed out: “These oxygen bottles do not last long. A COVID-19 patient who cannot find a vacant bed in the hospital and is asked to find oxygen and stay at home needs 40 or 50 liters of oxygen. So when the 10-liter oxygen bottle runs out, the patient dies because his heart stops. This is happening now and some patients have died in their homes.”

Jaroush said: “The cardiologist Dr. Mustafa Al-Khatib suffered from COVID-19 yesterday and could not find even a chair in the emergency department. Since yesterday we doctors have been trying to find a place for him so that he can have a blood test and a scan for his lungs. This is our situation.”

On Sunday, it was announced that the Military Hospital in Beirut also exceeded its capacity. The hospital cares for military personnel and their families.

This prompted its management to take 23 rooms in a private hospital that was damaged in the Beirut port explosion last August. The Lebanese Army Works Regiment is working to make it available within days to accommodate cases that need intensive care.

In addition to the lack of capacity, there was also a lack of medical supplies.

Activists on social media circulated calls to secure oxygen bottles that are needed for patients in hospitals that are needed for patients.

The search for hospital beds has caused disputes between the Lebanese Red Cross paramedics and some hospitals.

Georges Kettaneh, Lebanese Red Cross secretary-general, said: “The Red Cross responds to all crises in the country, especially COVID-19, and from the beginning we demanded hospitals to be ready. It was expected that disputes would arise between the Red Cross and some hospitals due to the decision of the Minister of Health in the caretaker government, Hamad Hassan, to receive all cases in hospitals.”

Assem Araji, the head of parliament’s health committee, said: “Despite the sanctions that the Ministry of Health decided to impose on some private hospitals that did not respond to the request to open departments to receive patients, certain hospitals did not comply. We have reached a catastrophic stage that calls for national responsibility.”

Araji expressed his belief that “a complete lockdown for 11 days is not sufficient to limit the spread of the virus. Rather, it should be closed for three weeks, as recommended by the World Health Organization.”

Many well-known figures in Lebanon have died of the coronavirus during the past days.