Saudi Arabia committed to tackling climate change, says Crown Prince

Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman at a meeting on the sidelines of the G20 summit in Osaka, Japan June 29, 2019. (Reuters/Handout)
Updated 01 July 2019

Saudi Arabia committed to tackling climate change, says Crown Prince

  • Prince Mohammed said that the Kingdom is working to develop a comprehensive and integrated energy-saving system
  • Added availability of and accessibility to energy is a priority for the Kingdom

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia is committed to “reducing greenhouse gas emissions and adapting to the negative effects of climate change,” Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman said at the G20 summit that ended on Saturday in Osaka, Japan.
Prince Mohammed said that the Kingdom is working to develop a comprehensive and integrated energy-saving system through energy efficiency programs.
He also said that the Kingdom has recently launched several projects aimed at increasing the production of renewable energy, and that integrating and exploiting all energy sources is a necessity.
The crown prince continued by saying that due to Saudi Arabia’s pivotal role in the world economy, the availability of and accessibility to energy is a priority for the Kingdom.
He added that due to more than a billion people not having a permanent source of energy around the world, the Kingdom stresses the need for cooperation on this issue and the support of less developed countries. He cited the 2008 Energy for the Poor Initiative as an example of this.
Prince Mohammed added that the Kingdom emphasizes the importance of the security and safety of energy supplies to ensure that the basic needs of the global economy are met.


Dr. Lilak Al-Safadi, president of the Saudi Electronic University

Updated 05 July 2020

Dr. Lilak Al-Safadi, president of the Saudi Electronic University

Saudi Education Minister Dr. Hamad bin Mohammed Al-Asheikh recently announced the appointment of Dr. Lilak Al-Safadi as president of the Saudi Electronic University. She becomes the first woman to chair a Saudi university that includes both male and female students.

She has worked as executive director for more than 20 years in business development, business consulting and strategic leadership, and accumulated experience in project management.

She has also published more than 50 research papers and articles on research topics such as e-commerce and artificial and commercial intelligence.

Al-Safadi was the vice president and national technology officer at Microsoft and is a faculty member at the King Saud University, Riyadh.

She also worked as a consultant to the governor of the General Authority for Small and Medium Enterprises (Monshaat), and a consultant to the vice presidency for planning, quality and development at the Saudi Electronic University. 

Al-Safadi is a graduate from the University of Wollongong, Australia with a Ph.D. in computer science which she completed in 2002; she majored in software engineering and completed her master’s in computer science in 1995. 

In a telephone interview with Al-Ekhbariya channel, Al-Safadi said that her appointment had many implications not only for empowering women and enhancing their role, but also as an indication of the Kingdom’s commitment to women’s equity at all levels, including equal opportunities in leadership and competition.