After backlash, Kardashian drops ‘Kimono’ name from underwear line

After backlash, Kardashian drops ‘Kimono’ name from underwear line
The mayor of Japan’s ancient capital Kyoto was among those who asked the reality television star to consider renaming her shapewear line. (File/AFP)
Updated 02 July 2019

After backlash, Kardashian drops ‘Kimono’ name from underwear line

After backlash, Kardashian drops ‘Kimono’ name from underwear line
  • She will change the name of her new “Kimono” line of underwear, after being accused of cultural appropriation
  • “My brands and products are built with inclusivity and diversity at their core and after careful thought and consideration,” Kardashian said

WASHINGTON: “Kimono” is now a no no, Kim Kardashian West said Monday.
The pop culture icon announced that she will change the name of her new “Kimono” line of underwear, after being accused of cultural appropriation.
Kardashian, who is married to rapper Kanye West, sparked a social media storm last week when she unveiled the new line, with some in Japan accusing her of disrespecting the traditional outfit.
Following the backlash, which included the trending Twitter hashtag #KimOhNo, Kardashian revealed on Twitter and to her 142 million followers on Instagram that she would change the name.
“When I announced the name of my shapewear line, I did so with the best intentions in mind,” Kardashian said.
“My brands and products are built with inclusivity and diversity at their core and after careful thought and consideration, I will be launching my Solutionwear brand under a new name,” she said.
Once a standard of the Japanese wardrobe, the kimono is now often reserved for special occasions, such as weddings and coming-of-age ceremonies, and is mostly worn by women.
The mayor of Japan’s ancient capital Kyoto was among those who asked the reality television star to consider renaming her shapewear line.
“Kimono is a traditional ethnic dress fostered in our rich nature and history,” Kyoto Mayor Daisaku Kadokawa wrote in a letter to Kardashian.
“(I) ask you to reconsider your decision of using the name Kimono in your trademark,” Kadokawa said.
Explaining her decision to change the name, Kardashian said “being an entrepreneur and my own boss has been one of the most rewarding challenges I’ve been blessed with in my life.
“What’s made it possible for me after all of these years has been the direct line of communication with my fans and the public,” she said. “I am always listening, learning and growing — I so appreciate the passion and varied perspectives that people bring to me.”
However, Kardashian’s U-turn did not appear to mollify Japanese officials, with Trade and Industry Minister Hiroshige Seko announcing that Tokyo would sent senior Patent Office staff to the US on July 9 to discuss the situation.
“The kimono is a culture our country has given to the world. In America as well, kimono has a high name recognition as being Japanese,” Seko told reporters in Tokyo.
“I hope the United States will take the appropriate screening measures, taking into account the spirit of the trademark system,” added the minister.


Models Tina Kunakey, Leila Nda star in latest Alaia campaign

Tina Kunakey stars in Alaia Spring 2021 RTW campaign. Supplied
Tina Kunakey stars in Alaia Spring 2021 RTW campaign. Supplied
Updated 20 January 2021

Models Tina Kunakey, Leila Nda star in latest Alaia campaign

Tina Kunakey stars in Alaia Spring 2021 RTW campaign. Supplied

DUBAI: Maison Alaia has unveiled its spring 2021 ready-to-wear campaign, starring models Tina Kunakey and Leila Nda.

The images were lensed by fashion photographer Pierre-Ange Carlotti. 

Kunakey and Nda star in the campaign photos wearing the latest pieces from the luxury label. 

For her part, Belgian-Burundian Nda wore a cream-colored blouse with bell sleeves tucked into tailored, high-waisted shorts. The look was elevated with a pair of black sunglasses.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by ALAÏA (@maisonalaia)

Meanwhile, 23-year-old Kunakey stunned in a creamy, Saharan-inspired  jacket and matching skirt. 

Nda and Kunakey starred in the campaign alongside other models Dieyna Ba and Thayna Soares.

Soares wore a printed top and coordinating skirt and Ba donned an embellished, halterneck midi dress.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by ALAÏA (@maisonalaia)

The offering is inspired by the couturier’s North African roots and his trip to the continent with the late photographer Peter Beard.

The house of Alaia was founded by the late Tunisian couturier Azzedine Alaia who died from a heart attack aged 82 in Nov 2017. 

Following his unexpected passing, Mr. Alaïa’s partners pledged to keep his brand alive and functioning. According to Carla Sozzani, one of Alaia’s closest collaborators, “there are enough products, samples and ideas in the archives to create new seasonal collections for generations.” 

Instead of referring to the designs as “collections,” the house now calls each new offering “Les Editions,” as they are renditions of the designer’s most iconic designs.

In November, the maison paid tribute to the couturier with its spring 2021 Editions of cult pieces. Embracing nostalgia, it was presented through an artistic dance performance.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by ALAÏA (@maisonalaia)

Supermodel Naomi Campbell, and the late designer’s honorary daughter, was joined by fellow model Karlie Kloss on the brand’s Instagram page, as they discussed the timeless silhouettes that have been reimagined for the new collection. The artistic performance was then shared across the Maison’s Instagram and YouTube platforms.

The dance presentation of the collection, which was live streamed from the cultural arts center La Gaité Lyrique in Paris, was performed by French-Moroccan dancer Hajiba Fahmy, who has worked with international superstar Beyonce. She wore a delicate white dressed plucked from the collection.