UN calls for Libya cease-fire as death toll climbs to 1,000

A migrant picks up clothes from among rubble at a detention centre for mainly African migrants that was hit by an air strike in the Tajoura suburb of the Libyan capital of Tripoli. (Reuters)
Updated 06 July 2019

UN calls for Libya cease-fire as death toll climbs to 1,000

  • Among the dead are 53 migrants killed Tuesday night in an air raid on a detention center in the Tripoli suburb of Tajoura
  • The fighting has forced more than 100,000 people to flee their homes and threatens to plunge Libya into deeper conflict

 

TRIPOLI: The UN Security Council called Friday for a cease-fire in Libya as the death toll from a three-month offensive on Tripoli reached 1,000, including scores killed in an air strike that hit a detention center for migrants.
The council condemned the late Tuesday attack on the Tajoura detention camp east of Tripoli and “stressed the need for all parties to urgently de-escalate the situation and to commit to a cease-fire,” said a joint statement.
Libyan commander Khalifa Haftar, whose forces hold eastern Libya and much of the country’s south, launched an offensive in early April to wrestle the capital from forces loyal to the UN-recognized Government of National Accord (GNA).
Air strikes and ground fighting have since left nearly 1,000 people dead and some 5,000 wounded, the UN’s World Health Organization said.
The fighting has forced more than 100,000 people to flee their homes and threatens to plunge Libya into deeper conflict.
Among the dead are 53 migrants killed Tuesday night in an air raid on a detention center in the Tripoli suburb of Tajoura, held by the GNA, which accused Haftar’s forces of carrying out the strike.
A Geneva-based spokesman for the International Organization for Migration said six children were among the migrants killed.
Joel Millman said that 350 migrants, including 20 women and four children, were still detained at the center, one of five air hangars hit in the raid.
World powers have been divided over how to respond to Haftar’s offensive, with the United States and Russia refusing to condemn the Libyan strongman.

FASTFACT

 

Some 5,700 refugees and migrants are being held in detention centers in Libya, 3,300 of whom are vulnerable to fighting in and around Tripoli.

The British-drafted council statement condemned the attack on the migrant camp, called for a return to political talks and for full respect of the arms embargo on Libya.
It followed a closed-door council meeting on Wednesday during which US diplomats said they needed more time to consult with Washington on the proposed text.
The United Nations has called for an independent investigation to determine who was responsible for the strike on the center, which housed some 600 migrants, mainly from African countries.
President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey — which backs the GNA — called for an end to “unlawful attacks” by Haftar’s forces during a meeting with Libyan Prime Minister Fayez Al-Sarraj in Istanbul on Friday, the Turkish presidency said.
UN agencies and humanitarian groups have repeatedly voiced concern over the plight of thousands of migrants and refugees held in detention centers near combat zones in the capital.
Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has expressed outrage over the attack and said the United Nations had shared the coordinates of the detention center with the warring sides to protect the civilians.
The carnage in Tajoura was “a tragedy that should have never happened,” said Charlie Yaxley, spokesman for the UN’s refugee agency.
Libya has become a major conduit for migrants seeking to reach Europe and remains prey to numerous militias vying for control of the country’s oil wealth.
Rights groups say migrants face horrifying abuses in Libya, and their plight has worsened since Haftar launched the offensive against Tripoli.
According to the UN, some 5,700 refugees and migrants are being held in detention centers in Libya, 3,300 of whom are vulnerable to fighting in and around Tripoli.
An initial lightning assault in early April saw Haftar’s self-styled Libyan National Army steam toward the capital. But they have since been bogged down on its southern outskirts, where frontlines have been frozen for months.
GNA forces launched a surprise counter-attack late last month, seizing the strategic town of Gharyan, the main supply base for Haftar’s offensive.
After the setback, Haftar’s forces threatened to intensify strikes against their rivals.
Both sides have launched daily air raids throughout the fighting and each lost several planes.
The rival camps have remained convinced that with the help of their backers, they can win the battle.
The GNA receives support from Turkey and Qatar, and Haftar is backed by the United Arab Emirates, Egypt, and according to experts, to some degree by the United States.


UAE airports screen passengers from China amid coronavirus outbreak

Updated 26 January 2020

UAE airports screen passengers from China amid coronavirus outbreak

  • Abu Dhabi and Dubai airports confirmed thermal screening had begun for people on direct flight from China
  • The death toll from the coronavirus has risen to 56 on Sunday morning, with the number of infected people also rising to almost 2000

DUBAI: Major airports in the UAE started screening passengers arriving from China over the weekend, as countries continued to step up precautions against the spread of the viral outbreak.

Abu Dhabi and Dubai airports confirmed thermal screening had begun following directives from the UAE’s Civil Aviation Authority and the Ministry of Health.

“All passengers arriving on direct flights from the People’s Republic of China must receive thermal screening at the gate upon arrival and be provided with informational leaflets,” the Dubai Airports said in a statement.

The check-ups will be held at “secured, closed gates” by airport medical teams and the Dubai Health Authority, according to Dubai Airports, assuring it “will continue to provide medical teams with any and all support that may be required.”

The Abu Dhabi International Airport also released a six-point list of “preventive tips” for people travelling to China.

UAE officials earlier confirmed there were no cases of coronavirus in the country, adding it was “in constant touch with the World Health Organization (WHO) to find out latest updates, recommendations and procedures taken in this matter.”

“The health situation poses no grounds for concern and the ministry is closely following up on the situation to ensure the health and safety of everyone,” said the National Committee for International Health Regulations and the Control of Pandemics in a statement.

The death toll from the coronavirus has risen to 56 on Sunday morning, with the number of infected people also rising to almost 2000, according to Chinese authorities.

The contagion remained centered on the Hubei provincial capital of Wuhan, but more than a dozen other cities in the province have been locked down in fears of further spreading.

The previously unknown virus has caused global concern because of its similarity to the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) pathogen, which killed hundreds across mainland China and Hong Kong in 2002-2003.