New orphan dugong named ‘handsome sea prince’ by Thai royal

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This photo taken on May 23, 2019 shows Mariam the dugong as she is cared for by park officials and veterinarians from the Phuket Marine Biological Centre on Libong island, Trang province in southern Thailand. (AFP)
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This picture taken on May 24, 2019 shows Mariam the dugong as she is cared for by park officials and veterinarians from the Phuket Marine Biological Centre on Libong island, Trang province in southern Thailand. (AFP)
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This picture taken on May 23, 2019 shows Mariam the dugong as she is cared for by park officials and veterinarians from the Phuket Marine Biological Centre on Libong island, Trang province in southern Thailand. (AFP)
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This undated handout from Thailand's Department of Marine and Coastal Resources released on July 6, 2019 shows Jamil the dugong as he is being cared for at the Phuket Marine Biological Center in Phuket. (AFP)
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This picture taken on May 23, 2019 shows Mariam the dugong as she swims in the waters around Libong island, Trang province in southern Thailand. (AFP)
Updated 07 July 2019

New orphan dugong named ‘handsome sea prince’ by Thai royal

  • The dugong named Mariam has become a social media star with photos and videos of her being cradled, fed, and swimming going viral after her rescue last month

BANLGKOK, THAILAND: A second orphan baby dugong found stranded on a southern Thai beach has been named “handsome sea prince” by one of the country’s princesses, officials said Saturday, as sea cow craze sweeps the kingdom.
Southern Thailand’s waters are home to about 250 of the mammals, classified as vulnerable. A baby dubbed Mariam washed ashore on its beaches last month — sparking interest in ocean conservation.
The newly named dugong was found Monday with scratches on its back and is now rehabilitating in a pool at the Phuket Marine Biological Center.
Thailand’s Department of Marine and Coastal Resources (DMCR) announced “Princess Sirivannavari has graciously named the baby dugong Jamil.”
The name “is from the Yawi language, and it means ‘handsome prince of the sea’,” the DMCR said.
Yawi is used in Thailand’s southernmost provinces and spoken by Muslim Malays.
The princess, who is a fashion designer, has taken “both dugongs... under her royal patronage,” the DMCR said in its post.
It added she has set up “working teams for the conservation of Thailand’s sea and corals, to conserve rare and near-extinct marine animals.”
The dugong named Mariam has become a social media star with photos and videos of her being cradled, fed, and swimming going viral after her rescue last month.
The DMCR is now setting up a livestream of her in captivity.
Mariam’s antics have captivated Thais, prompting a growing interest for ocean conservation in the country’s plastic-choked waters.
Dugong beachings can be attributed to fishing and other human activities, said the Phuket Marine Biological Center.


Europe’s ‘most wanted women’ targeted in new campaign

Iveta Tancosova. (Europol)
Updated 20 October 2019

Europe’s ‘most wanted women’ targeted in new campaign

  • The wanted suspects face a range of charges including murder, and human and drug trafficking

THE HAGUE: Europe’s policing agency Friday rolled out a new campaign to catch the continent’s most wanted female criminals, saying their crimes were just as serious as those committed by men.
Called the “Crime has no gender” campaign, Europol’s new website reveals the faces of fugitives wanted by 21 EU countries in an interactive way, Europol spokeswoman Tine Hollevoet said. Of those, 18 are women.
“People think that usually these crimes are not being committed by women, but they are and they are equally as serious as those committed by men,” she told AFP.
The wanted suspects face a range of charges including murder, and human and drug trafficking.
The interactive campaign first shows the suspects hidden behind spooky neon masks, before their faces are slowly revealed as viewers read the stories behind their crimes.
“After the last time a viewer scrolls, the face of the wanted fugitive is revealed and they will be able to see if it’s a man or a woman,” Hollevoet said.
“The idea is to attract as many visitors as possible, with experience showing us that the more eyes that look at the wanted fugitives, the higher the chance to locate and arrest the wanted person,” she said.
For instance, France is looking for Jessica Edosomwan, a Nigerian citizen who escaped after police raided a prostitution ring in the Lyon region in late 2007 and arrested 26 people.
The ring exploited some 60 prostitutes who were lured to France with the promise of a better future and were smuggled there through Libya.
Once in France, the destitute women were subjected to voodoo “juju” rites and their families threatened, French police told AFP.
The case against the suspects are expected to start in Lyon on November 6 and Edosomwan is the only suspect still outstanding.
She is believed to be either in the Benelux countries, Italy or Germany, police said. Another wanted suspect is Hungarian national Ildiko Dudas, 31, who is wanted for drug trafficking and child abuse. “Very often the suspect’s children were brought along to the drug transactions,” Europol said of Dudas.
Dudas was sentenced to six years in prison for crimes committed between 2011 and 2012 but her current whereabouts are unknown.
Europol’s “masquerade of crime” can be viewed on the following website www.eumostwanted.eu/crimehasnogender — along with instructions on how to send a tip-off to police.