Missile attack disrupts air traffic at Tripoli’s only functioning airport

Mitiga is the only working airport in Tripoli. (AFP/File photo)
Updated 11 July 2019

Missile attack disrupts air traffic at Tripoli’s only functioning airport

TRIPOLI: The Libyan capital's only functioning airport, Mitiga, temporary halted air traffic on Sunday after the facility was struck by missiles, according to a post on the airport authorities' Facebook page.

Three Afriqiyah airlines employees were injured and a plane was hit. No immediate comment was available from the carrier.

An airplane coming from Tunisia Carthage airport to Mitiga was redirected earlier Sunday to Misrata international airport that serves the Mediterranean coastal city of Misrata in Libya instead.

Air space re-opened hours later and carrier companies began receiving passengers to complete the rest of their re-scheduled flights for the day shortly.

Mitiga is the only working airport in Tripoli, which has been under attack for three months by the eastern-based Libyan National Army commanded by Khalifa Haftar. 

Speaking during a press conference in Benghazi, Libyan National Army Spokesperson, Ahmed Al-Mismari, said the rival government in Tripoli has lost their air force and are relying on drone aircraft.

He also said that any buildings that have erected antennas would be considered a legitimate target for the Libyan army.

During the conference, Al-Mismari showed a video showing that Daesh’s presence in the country is fading.

(With Reuters)

 


Thousands return to government-seized areas in northwest Syria: state media

Updated 15 September 2019

Thousands return to government-seized areas in northwest Syria: state media

  • The Syrian Observatory reported “around 3,000 people” going home from other areas under regime control
  • The Idlib region is one of the last holdouts of opposition forces

DAMASCUS: Thousands have returned to their hometowns in northwest Syria after military advances by government loyalist against militants and allied rebels, state media said Sunday.
“Thousands of citizens return to their villages and towns of the northern Hama countryside and the southern Idlib countryside,” state news agency SANA said.
The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a Britain-based monitor, reported “around 3,000 people” going home from other areas under regime control.
Since August 31, a cease-fire announced by regime backer Russia has largely held in northwestern Syria, though the Observatory has reported sporadic bombardment.
SANA said the returns came amid “government efforts to return the displaced to their towns and villages.”
The Idlib region of around three million people, many of them dispaced by fighting in other areas, is one of the last holdouts of opposition to forces backing Syrian President Bashar Assad.
Moscow announced the cease-fire late last month after four months of deadly violence that displaced 400,000 people, most of whom fled north within the jihadist-run bastion, according to the United Nations.
Regime forces had chipped away at the southern edges of the jihadist-run stronghold throughout August, retaking towns and villages in the north of Hama province and the south of Idlib province.
Syria’s civil war has killed more than 370,000 people since it started in 2011 with the repression of anti-government protests.
Assad’s regime now controls more than 60 percent of the country after notching up a series of victories against rebels and jihadists with key Russian backing since 2015.
But a large chunk of Idlib, fully administered by Syria’s former Al-Qaeda affiliate since January, as well as a Kurdish-held swathe of the oil-rich northeast, remain beyond its reach.