Thousands of expat health workers replaced in Oman

The number of Omanis working for the Ministry of Health is now more than 71 percent. (File/Shutterstock)
Updated 09 July 2019
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Thousands of expat health workers replaced in Oman

  • More than 39,000 Omanis now work for the country’s Ministry of Health
  • Before Omanization began expats accounted for more than 70% of the country’s workforce

DUBAI: Nearly 3,000 expats employed in Oman’s health sector were replaced in 2018 as the ongoing Omanization project aimed at reducing unemployment levels among the country’s nationals continued, national daily Times of Oman reported.

There were 2,869 foreign nationals replaced by Omanis from 2015 to 2019, pushing the proportion of locals working within the Ministry of Health to 39,220 – that’s 71 percent of the total workforce by the end of last year – according to Ministry of Health figures.

Oman introduced the expat visa ban in January 2018 for a six-month period for certain professions.

There have been a number of extensions to the ban since then and it has also been expanded to cover other industries and professions.

Tens of thousands of Omanis have found work since the ban was brought in.

Historically Gulf countries have been dependent on expatriate workers to power their economies.

A 2013 study revealed that up to 71 percent of Oman’s labor force were foreign-nationals.

In Qatar the expatriate workforce was as high as 95 percent, in the UAE it was 94 percent; 83 percent in Kuwait; 64 percent in Bahrain and 49 percent in Saudi Arabia.

The Gulf states have since launched nationalization programs to absorb more of their citizens into the workforce, slashing the high levels of unemployment.

Oman's expat population has dropped significantly since the introduction of the ban.


What We Are Reading Today: Yale Needs Women by Anne Gardiner Perkins

Updated 21 September 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Yale Needs Women by Anne Gardiner Perkins

  • The book is a historical novel based on the first females that were accepted and lived on campus at Yale

Yale Needs Women by Anne Gardiner Perkins is a historical novel based on the first females that were accepted and lived on campus at Yale starting the summer term of 1969.

“This is an academic work although written in a very accessible style for the average reader,” said a review in goodreads.com.

It said the book “started as a graduate paper and morphed into a dissertation over time.”

The review also said Perkins “really allows readers into the lives of several of the students and one administrator in particular.”

It said the author “straddles the line nicely between fitting in the comprehensive detailed research she managed and making it interesting enough that someone mighty think it was a novel.”

Perkins grew up in Baltimore and attended Yale University, where she earned her BA in history and was the first woman editor-in-chief of the Yale Daily News. 

She has spent her life in education, from urban high school teacher to elected school committee member. 

She has presented papers on higher education at leading conferences.

Although Yale Needs Women’s principal focus is on, well, women at Yale, Perkins also weaves in a lot of events that were also happening at the time and impacted Yale life, such at the Black Panther movement and the Vietnam War.