Egypt arrests Mubarak supporter who criticized government

Former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak, center front, arrives to testify during a session in the retrial of Muslim Brotherhood members at a makeshift courthouse in southern Cairo on December 26, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 11 July 2019

Egypt arrests Mubarak supporter who criticized government

  • Prosecutors on Thursday charged Karim Hussein with spreading false news and undermining national interests
  • Egypt’s military overthrew Hosni Mubarak, country’s first elected president, in 2013

CAIRO: Egypt has arrested the administrator of a Facebook page that supports former President Hosni Mubarak, who was forced from power by a pro-democracy uprising in 2011.
Prosecutors on Thursday charged Karim Hussein with spreading false news and undermining national interests after a series of posts that implied Mubarak did more to help the poor than the current government. Hussein was arrested Tuesday.
Egypt has waged a sweeping crackdown on dissent in recent years, jailing activists, bloggers and others under vague laws that criminalize nearly any criticism of authorities. Hussein’s Facebook page, “I am sorry, Mr. President,” has more than 3 million followers.
Egypt’s military overthrew the country’s first elected president, an Islamist who proved divisive, in 2013. Since then authorities have rolled back freedoms won in the 2011 uprising.


Algerian court jails protesters over election

Updated 19 November 2019

Algerian court jails protesters over election

ALGIERS: An Algerian court has jailed four protesters for 18 months for disrupting a candidate’s campaign for the Dec. 12 presidential election which is opposed by a mass protest movement.
The court sentenced the four on Monday after protests on Sunday in the western city of Tlemcen, where one of the five candidates, Ali Benflis, was campaigning. No details were available on what their exact actions were.
Algeria’s authorities are trying to quell a protest movement that erupted in February to demand the departure of the country’s ruling hierarchy, an end to corruption and the army’s withdrawal from politics.
The army, which has emerged as the most powerful institution in the country, has pushed for next month’s election as a means to end the protests and restore normality. The former president, Abdelaziz Bouteflika, quit in April.
The judgment comes a week after a series of other prison sentences were handed down to protesters who had raised flags with Berber symbols during earlier demonstrations.
Several opposition leaders have also been held during the protests, and charged with contributing to damaging army morale.
However, the authorities have also detained numerous current and former senior officials on corruption charges, and have jailed some of them including the once untouchable former intelligence chief.
The protesters have rejected any presidential election carried out now, saying the continued presence of Bouteflika allies in the upper echelons of the government mean it cannot be free or fair.
Human Rights Watch said last week that the arrest of scores of protesters looked like “part of a pattern of trying to weaken opposition to Algeria’s interim rulers and their determination to hold presidential elections.”