Huawei calls on US to lift export restrictions

American officials have accused Huawei of facilitating Chinese spying, a charge the company denies, and saw it as a growing competitor to US technology industries. (AFP)
Updated 12 July 2019

Huawei calls on US to lift export restrictions

  • American officials accuse Huawei of facilitating Chinese spying, a charge the company denies
  • Huawei reported earlier last year’s sales rose 19.5 percent over 2017 to $105.2 billion

SHENZHEN, China: The chairman of Huawei said Friday the Chinese tech giant has yet to see any benefit from President Donald Trump’s promise to allow US companies to sell some components to the company and called on Washington to remove it from a security blacklist.
The “unjust and unfair” decision to add Huawei Technologies, the biggest maker of network equipment for phone companies, to a list that restricts exports is hurting its US suppliers and global customers, Liang Hua told a news conference.
American officials accuse Huawei of facilitating Chinese spying, a charge the company denies, and see it as a growing competitor to US technology industries. Its founder, Ren Zhengfei, said in June the company has cut sales forecasts by $30 billion over the next two years due to curbs on access to US chips and other components.
Trump promised last month to allow some sales to Huawei but said it will stay on the “entity list” until talks over Washington’s tariff war with Beijing are concluded.
“So far we haven’t seen any tangible change,” Liang said.
“We’re not saying that just because things have relaxed a little, we’re fine with being on the blacklist,” he said. “Actually, we believe our listing on the blacklist should be lifted completely.”
Despite the US export restrictions, Huawei revenue grew in the first half of this year, Liang said. He declined to give details ahead of the release of financial results later this month.
Trump’s export curbs are a blow to US suppliers of chips and other technology for which Huawei is one of the biggest buyers.
Huawei reported earlier last year’s sales rose 19.5 percent over 2017 to $105.2 billion. The company founder, Ren Zhengfei, said ahead of that he expected sales to rise 30 percent this year, but those plans were derailed by Trump’s export curbs.
Liang said Huawei is deciding how to respond to possible loss of access to Google’s Android operating system for its mobile phones under Trump’s curbs. Huawei, the No. 2 global smartphone brand after Samsung, has developed its own operating system, Hongmeng, but has said so far it has no plans to use it on phones.
“The open Android operating system and ecosystem is still our first choice,” said Liang. “Of course, if America doesn’t let us use it, then might we in the future develop our own Hongmeng as our cellphone operating system? We still haven’t decided yet.”
Huawei also is developing its own chips and other technology, which would reduce the amount it spends on US components and help to insulate the company against possible supply disruptions. Huawei announced plans in January for a next-generation smartphone based on its own chips.


Dubai carrier Emirates doubts Boeing 777x aircraft delivery in 2020

Updated 14 October 2019

Dubai carrier Emirates doubts Boeing 777x aircraft delivery in 2020

  • Emirates is a launch customer of the world’s biggest twin engined jet
  • The US planemaker suspended load testing of the plane when media reports said a cargo door failed a ground stress test

DUBAI: Emirates doubts it will receive any of the 115 Boeing 777-9s it has ordered next year, its president said on Monday, as the US planemaker grapples with challenges in building the jet.
Emirates, a launch customer of the world’s biggest twin engined jet, was to receive its first 777-9 in 2020 but the manufacturer has suspended load testing of the plane.
“... By the end of next year we were to have eight of them. Now it doesn’t look like we will have any,” Tim Clark said at a conference in Dubai.
Boeing suspended load testing of the new widebody in September when media reports said a cargo door failed a ground stress test. There have also been issues with General Electric Co’s new GE9X turbine engine that will power the jet.
Boeing has said it expects to hold the initial flight test in 2020 and is aiming for the 777X to enter commercial service in the same year.
Clark said he had told Boeing he insists on a 13- to 16-month test period for the new jet.
Emirates ordered 150 777X jets, including 777-8 variants, in 2013. It later placed a preliminary order for 40 Boeing 787 Dreamliner jets in 2017, which Clark said he still saw a place for in the airline’s fleet plans.
Boeing has also been unable to deliver any of its 737 MAX aircraft since the single-aisle plane was grounded worldwide in March after two fatal crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed 346 people.
Clark said in September Emirates would not take new Airbus and Boeing planes unless they were truly ready, and said that engine makers Rolls Royce and GE must improve their reliability.
Aircraft manufacturers should not over promise on new aircraft capability, he said on Monday.
Emirates has also signed deals for 40 Airbus A330-900s and 30 A350-900s.