Princess Lamia bint Majid Al-Saud, champion of Generation Unlimited

Princess Lamia bint Majid Al-Saud
Updated 15 July 2019

Princess Lamia bint Majid Al-Saud, champion of Generation Unlimited

Princess Lamia bint Majid Al-Saud has been appointed a champion of Generation Unlimited, a global partnership that aims to boost the productivity of young people.

Launched in 2018, Generation Unlimited is a partnership hosted by UNICEF to connect secondary-age students with employment and entrepreneurship, empowering young people to thrive in the world of work.

Using her leading role and widespread experience, Princess Lamia will focus on generating private sector support and advocating programs that develop young people.

Princess Lamia is also the secretary-general of Alwaleed Philanthropies and is a member of its board of trustees. She also worked as executive manager of media and communications at Alwaleed Philanthropies between 2014 and 2016. 

She has a bachelor’s degree in public relations, marketing and advertising from Misr International University in Cairo, Egypt.

In 2003, the princess founded Sada Al-Arab, a publishing company operating from Cairo, Beirut and Dubai. 

She also co-founded Media Codes Ltd. in Egypt and the Fortune Media Group in Lebanon and Saudi Arabia. 

She was editor in chief of Rotana magazine between 2004 and 2006. She held the same position at Mada magazine between 2002 and 2008. 

In 2017, she was awarded the prestigious Arab Women’s Award for her charitable work.


Saudi tourism megaproject aims to turn the Red Sea green

Updated 38 min 53 sec ago

Saudi tourism megaproject aims to turn the Red Sea green

  • Development will protect endangered hawksbill turtle, while coral research could help save the Great Barrier Reef

RIYADH: Key ecological targets are driving Saudi Arabia’s Red Sea tourism megaproject, its leader has told Arab News.

The development will not only protect the habitat of the endangered hawksbill turtle, but could also save coral reefs that are dying elsewhere in the world, said Red Sea Development Company Chief Executive John Pagano.

The project is taking shape in a 28,000 square kilometer region of lagoons, archipelagos, canyons and volcanic geology between the small towns of Al-Wajh and Umluj on the Kingdom’s west coast.

One island, Al-Waqqadi, looked like the perfect tourism destination, but was discovered to be a breeding ground for the hawksbill. “In the end, we said we’re not going to develop it. It shows you can balance development and conservation,” Pagano said.

Scientists are also working to explain why the area’s coral reef system — fourth-largest in the world —  is thriving when others around the world are endangered.

“To the extent we solve that mystery, the ambition would be to export that to the rest of the world,” Pagano said. “Can we help save the Great Barrier Reef or the Caribbean coral that has been severely damaged?”

 

ALSO READ: INTERVIEW: Saudi Arabia’s Red Sea project to set ‘new global standards in sustainability’, says CEO