Historic Jeddah Season celebrations wind up this week

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Memories of old Balad. (AN Photo/Essam Al-Ghalib)
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A photo of old Balad. (AN Photo/Essam Al-Ghalib)
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A photo of old Balad. (AN Photo/Essam Al-Ghalib)
Updated 16 July 2019

Historic Jeddah Season celebrations wind up this week

  • The fun continues until July 18 and there is still plenty to enjoy

JEDDAH: The first edition of Historic Jeddah Season will conclude this week and organizers are urging residents and visitors to make the most of the fun-filled activities while they can.

Al-Balad district, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, has served as a gateway to the Kingdom during the festival, which showcased and celebrated the unique culture and heritage of the city. 

Art, technology, musicals, theater performances and many other never-seen-before attractions have taken visitors on a unique journey through the rich history of Jeddah.

Historic Jeddah Season, which has already established itself as one of the highlights of Jeddah’s social calendar, enthralled visitors and locals alike with impressive installations, daring acts of strength, performances by internationally renowned artists and appearances by world-famous chefs.

The fun continues until July 18 and there is still plenty to enjoy. The event offers “a surprise in every corner” and something for everyone, including a wide variety of food options, exciting family entertainment, live performances, amusing stunts and interesting workshops designed to educate, entertain and engage.

For more details about the remainder of the festival, visit www.livehjseason.com.


Saudi tourism megaproject aims to turn the Red Sea green

Updated 24 min 24 sec ago

Saudi tourism megaproject aims to turn the Red Sea green

  • Development will protect endangered hawksbill turtle, while coral research could help save the Great Barrier Reef

RIYADH: Key ecological targets are driving Saudi Arabia’s Red Sea tourism megaproject, its leader has told Arab News.

The development will not only protect the habitat of the endangered hawksbill turtle, but could also save coral reefs that are dying elsewhere in the world, said Red Sea Development Company Chief Executive John Pagano.

The project is taking shape in a 28,000 square kilometer region of lagoons, archipelagos, canyons and volcanic geology between the small towns of Al-Wajh and Umluj on the Kingdom’s west coast.

One island, Al-Waqqadi, looked like the perfect tourism destination, but was discovered to be a breeding ground for the hawksbill. “In the end, we said we’re not going to develop it. It shows you can balance development and conservation,” Pagano said.

Scientists are also working to explain why the area’s coral reef system — fourth-largest in the world —  is thriving when others around the world are endangered.

“To the extent we solve that mystery, the ambition would be to export that to the rest of the world,” Pagano said. “Can we help save the Great Barrier Reef or the Caribbean coral that has been severely damaged?”

 

ALSO READ: INTERVIEW: Saudi Arabia’s Red Sea project to set ‘new global standards in sustainability’, says CEO