13 killed as minibus plunges into gorge in Iran

The accidents are linked to the poor state of Iranian vehicles, in part due to decades of economic sanctions, and a general disregard for basic road safety. (File photo: Reuters)
Updated 16 July 2019

13 killed as minibus plunges into gorge in Iran

  • The accident took place between Buin va Miandasht city and Khansar

TEHRAN: Three babies were among 13 people killed Tuesday when a minibus they were traveling in plunged into a gorge in central Iran, state news agency IRNA reported.
The brakes of the 1970s Mercedes-Benz failed during a descent in Isfahan province, Khansar city governor Mansour Kamali said.
“Ten adults and three babies were killed, and nine people were injured,” Kamali said, quoted by IRNA.
The accident took place between Buin va Miandasht city and Khansar, according to the governor.
Despite the general good state of Iran’s roads, the country has one of the world’s highest traffic death rates.
The accidents are linked to the poor state of Iranian vehicles, in part due to decades of economic sanctions, and a general disregard for basic road safety.


Macron slams Turkey’s aggression in Syria as ‘madness’, bewails NATO inaction

Updated 19 October 2019

Macron slams Turkey’s aggression in Syria as ‘madness’, bewails NATO inaction

  • EU Council President Donald Tusk said the halt of Turkish hostilities as demanded by the US is not a genuine cease-fire
  • He calls on Ankara to immediately stop military operations,

BRUSSELS/ANKARA: Macron critizes Turkey's aggression in Syria as "madness', bewails NATO inaction

France’s President Emmanuel Macron has bemoaned Turkey’s offensive into northern Syria as “madness” and decried NATO’s inability to react to the assault as a “serious mistake.”

“It weakens our credibility in finding partners on the ground who will be by our side and who think they will be protected in the long term. So that raises questions about how NATO functions.”

EU Council President Donald Tusk said the halt of Turkish hostilities is not a genuine cease-fire and called on Ankara to immediately stop military operations in Syria.

Dareen Khalifa, a senior Syria analyst at the International Crisis Group, said the cease-fire had unclear goals. 

There was no mention of the scope of the area that would be under Turkish control and, despite US Vice President Mike Pence referring to a 20-mile zone, the length of the zone remains ambiguous, she said.

Selim Sazak, a doctoral researcher at Brown University, believed the agreement would be implemented and the YPG would withdraw.

“The agency of the YPG is fairly limited. If the deal collapses because of the YPG, it’s actually all the better for Ankara,” he told Arab News. “What Ankara originally wanted was to take all of the belt into its control and eliminate as many of the YPG forces as possible. Instead, the YPG is withdrawing with a portion of its forces and its territory intact. Had the deal collapsed because of the YPG, Ankara would have reason to push forward, this time with much more legitimacy.”