Saudi youths construct historic market for Souq Okaz

In this file photo, people are seen outside the Souq Okaz theater in Taif. A giant market has been built for the latest session of the festival, with Saudi youths contributing a lot of effort to its completion. (SPA photo)
Updated 19 July 2019

Saudi youths construct historic market for Souq Okaz

  • A total of 67 young men and women took part in the construction of the historic market area
  • Work was carried out with the assistance of 247 on-site workers of different nationalities

RIYADH: A group of Saudi youths has helped to build a giant market for the latest session of Souq Okaz, one of the most famous historical attractions of its kind in the Arabian Peninsula.

A total of 67 young men and women took part in the construction of the historic market area extending over 41,000 square meters, as part of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage’s (SCTH) drive to support youth employment and skills in the Kingdom.

The work, completed over 35 days at the 13th session of Souq Okaz, was carried out with the assistance of 247 on-site workers of different nationalities.

The team participated in various roles including art, engineering, design, carpentry and blacksmithing, plumbing and electrics.

Souk Okaz has 200 shops selling pottery, silverware, glassware, wall arts and historical manuscripts, as well as textiles, handicrafts and leather goods. The market also includes restaurants and cafes.

SCTH is working with partners to maintain and improve the services and facilities at Okaz Souq for the new season of unique events and programs.

 

 


Saudi bridge continues to aid stricken in Lebanon

KSRelief provided urgent food supplies to affected people living in the areas adjacent to the port, covering 500 families. (SPA)
Updated 10 August 2020

Saudi bridge continues to aid stricken in Lebanon

  • So far, 290 tons of aid transported to provide urgent humanitarian needs to people affected by explosion

JEDDAH: Aid continues to flow into the Lebanese capital Beirut, as the fourth Saudi air bridge plane operated by the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) arrived on Sunday.
Ninety tons of emergency aid was flown in on the flight, including medical materials and equipment, foodstuff and shelter supplies. Medicines, burn treatments, medical solutions, masks, gloves, sterilizers and other surgical materials will be distributed by special teams on the ground.
The plane also carried food baskets that included flour and dates as well as shelter materials such as tents, blankets, mattresses, and utensils.
So far, 290 tons of aid has been transported from Saudi Arabia to Lebanon as per the directives of King Salman to provide urgent humanitarian aid to the Lebanese people affected by the explosion at the Port of Beirut.
This aid was provided based on an assessment report of the necessary humanitarian needs resulting from the explosion, in coordination with the Saudi Embassy in Beirut, and the KSRelief branch in Lebanon.
This comes as an extension of the efforts made by Saudi Arabia to show solidarity with the Lebanese people and to provide relief to those affected by the disaster.

FASTFACT

So far, 290 tons of aid has been transported from Saudi Arabia to Lebanon as per the directives of King Salman to provide urgent humanitarian aid to the Lebanese people affected by the explosion at the Port of Beirut.

KSRelief provided urgent food supplies to affected people living in the areas adjacent to the port on Sunday, covering 500 families.
Saudi Ambassador to Lebanon Waleed bin Abdullah Bukhari told Arab News that special committees would oversee and review reports on the Lebanese people’s needs.
“Aid will continue to flow into Lebanon after assessing the required needs of the Lebanese people in cooperation with the relevant authorities in Lebanon,” he said.
Countries around the world have come together to help Lebanon in the wake of the explosion on Aug. 4, which devastated large areas of Beirut, damaging and destroying infrastructure, buildings and homes, including all port facilities and the country’s grain storage silos.