Janet Jackson, 50 Cent and Future to perform at Jeddah World Fest

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Superstar singer Janet Jackson headlines the Jeddah Season festival. (Jeddah World Fest)
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American artist Chris Brown will also be performing. (Jeddah World Fest)
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... and so is American rapper 50 Cent. (Jeddah World Fest)
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American rapper Future will also fly in to perform. (Jeddah World Fest)
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Liam Payne is performing as part of the Jeddah World Fest events. (Jeddah World Fest)
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The MC Super duo R3WIRE & VARSKI are also confirmed to perform. (Jeddah World Fest)
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And so is DJ Steve Aoki. (Jeddah World Fest)
Updated 19 July 2019

Janet Jackson, 50 Cent and Future to perform at Jeddah World Fest

  • All three stars will be performing in Saudi Arabia for the first time
  • The concert on Thursday will also include performances from musician Steve Aoki, and singer Liam Payne

JEDDAH: More high-profile stars are set to perform in Saudi Arabia as part of the Jeddah World Fest, with superstar singer Janet Jackson along with American rappers 50 Cent and Future and R&B artist Chris Brown heading to the Kingdom.

“We can’t wait to see this incredible icon in Jeddah,” the Jeddah Season Twitter account said of Jackson, one of the most successful female solo acts of all time.

All stars will be performing in Saudi Arabia for the first time.

The concert on Thursday will also include performances from musician Steve Aoki and singer Liam Payne and MC Super duo R3WIRE & VARSKI.

The music festival is part of the Jeddah Season of activities which falls under the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage’s (SCTH) ambitious program of seasonal entertainment for the Kingdom.

Tickets are available at: www.jeddahworldfest.com.


‘Noura’s Dream’ becomes nightmare dilemma in this raw tale

Hend Sabry plays the lead role in ‘Noura’s Dream.’ (Supplied)
Updated 16 October 2019

‘Noura’s Dream’ becomes nightmare dilemma in this raw tale

CHENNAI: Hinde Boujemaa’s “Noura’s Dream,” which premiered at the recent Toronto International Film Festival and later featured at El Gouna Film Festival, saw the movie’s protagonist, Hend Sabry (Noura), clinch best actress award at the latter.

The director, who also wrote the script, tackles an unusual dilemma for a woman being pulled in three different directions by her husband, lover and three young children, two of them girls.

It is certainly not an easy task to lead a story such as this – emotionally complicated and set in Tunisia – to a closure.

In an interview with Variety, Boujemaa said: “There have been movies about adultery, but very few of them have been wholly empathetic to the woman. There’s often a kind of moral judgement attached. I wanted to make a film without any hint of moralizing.”

“Noura’s Dream” opens with a romantic scene. Working in a prison laundry, she is seen on her phone talking to her lover, handsome garage mechanic Lassaad (Hakim Boumsaoudi), and the two are all set to marry, her divorce just days away.

Her husband, Jamel (Lotfi Abdelli), is in jail having been caught committing petty crimes but when he is freed early after a presidential pardon, things get messy.

The director tackles an unusual dilemma for a woman being pulled in three different directions by her husband, lover and three young children. (Supplied) 

Boujemaa’s film has the feel of a Ken Loach (British director) movie, with its take on the predicament of the working class. There is a certain raw quality about “Noura’s Dream,” devoid of the polish and psychological complexities of “Marriage Story” (screened at Venice), in which auteur Noah Baumbach portrays the pain of a marital split with a degree of levity and sophistication.

A similar approach and treatment cannot be taken with Noura’s story, which is set in a very different kind of social environment that gives little freedom or equality to a woman. Take, for instance, the scene in which Noura’s defense lawyer, a woman, makes her client feel small and guilty, reminding her of the injustice and harm a split would do to her children.

Boujemaa’s film has the feel of a Ken Loach (British director) movie. (Supplied) 

Sabry brings to the fore the quandary of Noura, who is completely lost.

Should she go ahead with the divorce and marry Lassaad, a union that could mean abandoning her children who need their mother? Or should she stick with her wayward husband? There are no easy answers.