What We Are Reading Today: Emperors Of The Deep by William McKeever

Updated 18 July 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Emperors Of The Deep by William McKeever

  • Sharks are evolutionary marvels essential to maintaining a balanced ecosystem

In this groundbreaking book, a documentarian and conservationist, determined to dispel misplaced fear and correct common misconceptions, explores in-depth the secret lives of sharks — magnificent creatures who play an integral part in maintaining the health of the world’s oceans and ultimately the planet, according to published on goodreads.com.

From the Jaws blockbusters to Shark Week, we are conditioned to see sharks as terrifying cold-blooded underwater predators. But as Safeguard the Seas founder William McKeever reveals, sharks are evolutionary marvels essential to maintaining a balanced ecosystem.

We can learn much from sharks, he argues, and our knowledge about them continues to grow. The first book to reveal in full the hidden lives of sharks, Emperors of the Deep examines four species — Mako, Tiger, Hammerhead, and Great White — as never before, and includes fascinating details.

McKeever goes back through time to probe the shark’s pre-historic secrets and how it has become the world’s most feared and most misunderstood predator.


What We Are Reading Today: Hosts and Guests by Nate Klug

Updated 23 September 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Hosts and Guests by Nate Klug

Nate Klug has been hailed by the Threepenny Review as a poet who is “an original in Eliot’s sense of the word.” 

In Hosts and Guests, his exciting second collection, Klug revels in slippery roles and shifting environments. The poems move from a San Francisco tech bar and a band of Pokémon Go players to the Shakers and St. Augustine, as they explore the push-pull between community and solitude, and past and present. 

Hosts and Guests gathers an impressive range: Critiques of the “immiserated quiet” of modern life, love poems and poems of new fatherhood, and studies of a restless, nimble faith. At a time when the meanings of hospitality and estrangement have assumed a new urgency, Klug takes up these themes in chiseled, musical lines that blend close observation of the natural world, social commentary, and spiritual questioning. 

As Booklist has observed of his work, “The visual is rendered sonically, so perfectly one wants to involve the rest of the senses, to speak the lines, to taste the syllables.”