What We Are Reading Today: Bottle of Lies by Katherine Eban

Updated 19 July 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Bottle of Lies by Katherine Eban

  • She lectures frequently on the topic of pharmaceutical integrity

Katherine Eban, the author of Bottle of Lies, is an investigative reporter focusing on the pharmaceutical industry for many years.

She lectures frequently on the topic of pharmaceutical integrity.

In a review for The New York Times, critic David Dobbs said Bottle of Lies “is an invaluable exposé, a reportorial tour de force and a well-turned epic.”

A review in goodreads.com said Bottle of Lies “takes us into a world where generic drugs are designed and manufactured.”

“A decade-long investigation with international sweep, high-stakes brinkmanship and big money at its core, Bottle of Lies reveals how the world’s greatest public-health innovation has become one of its most astonishing swindles,” it added.

The review said Bottle of Lies “exposes the deceit behind generic-drug manufacturing— and the attendant risks for global health. Drawing on exclusive accounts from whistleblowers and regulators, as well as thousands of pages of confidential documents, Eban reveals an industry where fraud is rampant.”


What We Are Reading Today: Give and Take by Nitsan Chorev

Updated 13 December 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Give and Take by Nitsan Chorev

Give and Take looks at local drug manufacturing in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda, from the early 1980s to the present, to understand the impact of foreign aid on industrial development. 

While foreign aid has been attacked by critics as wasteful, counterproductive, or exploitative, Nitsan Chorev makes a clear case for the effectiveness of what she terms “developmental foreign aid.”

Against the backdrop of Africa’s pursuit of economic self-sufficiency, the battle against AIDS and malaria, and bitter negotiations over affordable drugs, Chorev offers an important corrective to popular views on foreign aid and development, says a review on the Princeton University Press website. 

She shows that when foreign aid has provided markets, monitoring, and mentoring, it has supported the emergence and upgrading of local production. 

Without losing sight of domestic political-economic conditions, historical legacies, and foreign aid’s own internal contradictions, Give and Take presents groundbreaking insights into the conditions under which foreign aid can be effective.