BMW and Tencent to open computing center in China for self-driving cars

A BMW self-driving test vehicle at an event announcing the German automaker’s partnership with China’s Tencent Holdings in Beijing. (Reuters)
Updated 20 July 2019

BMW and Tencent to open computing center in China for self-driving cars

  • BMW’s planned Chinese computing center follows the opening earlier this year of a similar computing center in Munich

BEIJING: German automaker BMW and Chinese online gaming giant Tencent Holdings are teaming up to launch a computing center in China that will help develop self-driving cars in the world’s biggest auto market, the companies said on Friday.
The computing center, which will start operations by the end of the year, will provide cars with data-crunching capabilities to help them drive semi-autonomously and, eventually, autonomously.
The two companies did not disclose the investment in the center. Sources familiar with the deal said the center will be built in the eastern city of Tianjin.
The establishment of the center “will support BMW’s autonomous driving development and innovation in China,” Jochen Goller, head of BMW’s China operations, said in a statement.
“BMW can, therefore, develop autonomous driving solutions that fit better with the specific driving conditions in China.”

HIGHLIGHTS

• Center will give cars data crunching capabilities.

• Investment in facility not disclosed.

• To be located in Tianjin city.

BMW said the new computing center will leverage Tencent’s cloud computing and big data, and provide the automaker with infrastructure needed to develop the autonomous cars.
The Munich-headquartered automaker says it will likely introduce semi-autonomous, or L3 classification, cars in China in 2021 which would need massive computing power to analyze real-time flow of digital information on road and traffic conditions.
Driverless cars need sophisticated data-crunching capabilities as they rely on so-called artificial-intelligence, or neuro-network technology, to help them “learn” from experience and could eventually drive themselves without human intervention.
BMW’s planned Chinese computing center follows the opening earlier this year of a similar computing center in Munich.


Hong Kong posts biggest airport passenger number fall in a decade

Updated 15 December 2019

Hong Kong posts biggest airport passenger number fall in a decade

  • The airport handled just over five million passengers, down 16.2 percent from a year earlier
  • Hong Kong has been gripped by sometimes violent protests since June

HONG KONG: Hong Kong International Airport reported its biggest fall in passenger numbers in more than a decade in November, official data released on Sunday showed.
The airport handled just over five million passengers, down 16.2 percent from a year earlier, Airport Authority Hong Kong said in a statement.
That was the largest fall since June 2009, when the figure fell by 18.7 percent, data on the Civil Aviation Department’s website showed.
There were falls of more than 12 percent in the three previous months, the Civil Aviation Department data showed.
Hong Kong has been gripped by sometimes violent protests since June. Demonstrators halted operations at the airport for several days in August.
The Airport Authority did not immediately comment.