UAE convicts Filipino to 10 years for joining Daesh

UAE convicts Filipino to 10 years for joining Daesh
The UAE passed a law last year to combat terrorism financing and in 2014 passed an anti-terrorism law. (File/Reuters)
Updated 25 July 2019

UAE convicts Filipino to 10 years for joining Daesh

UAE convicts Filipino to 10 years for joining Daesh

DUBAI: A man from the Philippines has been sentenced to 10 years in jail in the United Arab Emirates for being a member of Daesh and promoting the group's ideology on social media, State news agency WAM reported on Thursday.
The defendant was identified as a 35-year-old Asian man, Hassan D.A.A, who was fined $544,54 by the Abu Dhabi Court of Appeal and will be deported after serving his sentence.

UAE media said the man was a Filipino domestic worker. 

The court confiscated his personal computers, mobile phones and cameras, and closed his social media sites that published information, articles, videos, photos and films that promoted Daesh, defended its ideologies and terrorist practices and urged people to financially support it.

The UAE passed a law last year to combat terrorism financing and in 2014 passed an anti-terrorism law.


Pentagon includes Israel in Middle East command area

Pentagon includes Israel in Middle East command area
Updated 2 min 16 sec ago

Pentagon includes Israel in Middle East command area

Pentagon includes Israel in Middle East command area
  • Moving Israel under the Central Command potentially makes security cooperation with the US on regional matters easier
  • The move could bring Israeli military officials in closer proximity to those of Gulf neighbors

WASHINGTON: The US Defense Department announced Friday that it would include close ally Israel in the area covered by its Middle East-focused Central Command.
In another sign of the rapprochement brokered by President Donald Trump between Israel and Arab countries, the Pentagon said US military dealings with Israel would no longer be handled by its European Command.
“We structure boundaries to best mitigate risk and protect US interests and partners,” the Pentagon said in a statement.
“The easing of tensions between Israel and its Arab neighbors subsequent to the Abraham Accords has provided a strategic opportunity for the United States to align key partners against shared threats in the Middle East.”
That was mainly a reference to Iran, which the United States, Israel and Arab countries view as the leading security threat to the region.
For decades at odds with its Arab neighbors over its treatment of Palestinians, Israel has over the past year broken barriers on open cooperation and communications with Gulf countries under the Trump-fostered Abraham Accords.
Moving it under the Central Command potentially makes security cooperation with the United States on regional matters easier, and could bring Israeli military officials in closer proximity to those of Gulf neighbors.
But it could also complicate CentCom cooperation with Iran allies like Iraq, where the US retains 2,500 troops.
“Israel is a leading strategic partner for the United States, and this will open up additional opportunities for cooperation with our US Central Command partners, while maintaining strong cooperation between Israel and our European allies,” the Pentagon said.