China's foreign minister criticizes US tariffs

Chinese Foreign Minister spoke Friday after President Donald Trump said he will impose 10% tariffs Sept. 1 on the remaining $300 billion in Chinese imports he hasn't already taxed. (Shutterstock)
Updated 02 August 2019

China's foreign minister criticizes US tariffs

  • Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi has criticized President Donald Trump's proposed tariff hike
  • The president has already imposed 25% tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese products, and Beijing has retaliated by taxing $110 billion in U.S. goods

WASHINGTON: The Latest on President Donald Trump's plan to impose tariffs beginning Sept. 1 on the $300 billion in Chinese imports he hasn't already hit with taxes (all times local):

Midnight

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi has criticized President Donald Trump's proposed tariff hike. "Imposing tariffs is definitely not the right way to resolve trade frictions," Wang told reporters in Bangkok, where he was attending a meeting of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations.

He spoke Friday after President Donald Trump said he will impose 10% tariffs Sept. 1 on the remaining $300 billion in Chinese imports he hasn't already taxed.

The president has already imposed 25% tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese products, and Beijing has retaliated by taxing $110 billion in U.S. goods.

7:30 p.m.
U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres says he's worried about tensions between the world's two largest global economies — the United States and China.

The U.N. chief told reporters Thursday: "We need to learn the lessons of the Cold War and avoid a new one." "Looking into the not so distant future," Guterres said, "I see the possibility of the emergence of two competing blocs —- each with their own dominant currency, trade and financial rules, their own internet and artificial intelligence strategy, and their own contradictory geopolitical and military views."

The secretary-general said there is still time to avoid this scenario, reiterating that "with leadership committed to strategic cooperation and to managing competing interests, we can steer the world onto a safer path." Guterres spoke shortly before Trump's tweet on tariffs against China.

4:43 p.m.
Retailers are lining up against the proposed tariffs. "We are disappointed the administration is doubling-down on a flawed tariff strategy that is already slowing U.S. economic growth, creating uncertainty and discouraging investment," said David French, senior vice president for government relations at the National Retail Federation.

"These additional tariffs will only threaten U.S. jobs and raise costs for American families on everyday goods. "The tariffs imposed over the past year haven't worked, and there's no evidence another tax increase on American businesses and consumers will yield new results."

4:12 p.m.
Moody's Investors Service is warning that Trump's planned tariffs will prove to be an economic drag. "The escalation of trade tensions will increasingly weigh on the global economy and supply chains in an environment of already decelerating growth in the U.S., the euro area and China," said Elena Duggar, Moody's associate managing director.

"The tariffs will be credit negative for a number of U.S. sectors, including computers and electronics, manufacturing and apparel and leather."

3:42 p.m.
The top Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee denounced Trump's plan. "I am always first in line for getting tough on China," said Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon. "But Trump doesn't have any strategy to get China to stop cheating on trade. The only thing he knows how to do is raise tariffs.

"The tariffs announced today will raise costs on everything from computers to backpacks to clothes as kids go back to school, without any reason to think that it will make China stop stealing our technology and undercutting American jobs."


Afghan delegates head online for crucial talks

Updated 01 June 2020

Afghan delegates head online for crucial talks

  • Peace hopes rest on virtual forum with Taliban amid virus threat

KABUL: Afghan government and Taliban delegates are expected to begin online talks in mid-June in a bid to end a decades-old conflict in the country, officials told Arab News on Sunday.

While past meetings have been held in person, the latest round of negotiations will take place online because of the threat of coronavirus in the war-ravaged country.

“We see no challenges, the atmosphere and preparations are all set for the talks,” Feraidoon Khawzoon, a spokesman for Abdullah Abdullah, newly appointed chief of the High Council for National Reconciliation, told Arab News.

Negotiations could begin in “the next 10 or 15 days,” he said.

“The announcement of a cease-fire, a reduction in violence and the exchange of prisoners were all requirements for the start of the talks, and we have had progress on them recently,” Khawzoon said.

On Wednesday the Afghan government released a list of 20 delegates due to hold peace talks with the Taliban.

The team will be led by Mohammad Masoom Stanekzai, a former spy chief who has held indirect negotiations with the militants in the past outside Afghanistan, he added.

In the lead-up to the talks, President Ashraf Ghani’s government will release 3,000 more Taliban prisoners, an official close to the Afghan leader told Arab News on condition of anonymity.

More than 2,000 Taliban inmates have already been freed as part of a historic peace deal in February.

In return, the Taliban released hundreds of government troops and, in a surprise move, announced a three-day cease-fire last week for Eid Al-Fitr.

The peace moves follow a buildup in fighting between the two sides despite the pandemic. Taliban attacks killed at least 146 people and injured 430 during Ramadan. 

Fears had been growing that the peace deal signed on Feb. 29 between the Taliban and the US would collapse.

The joint cease-fire followed talks in Qatar last week between the Taliban and Zalmay Khalilzad, US special representative for Afghanistan.

Khalilzad later traveled to Kabul for meetings with Afghan political leaders over a reduction in violence and an exchange of prisoners. 

“We welcome the Taliban’s decision to observe a cease-fire during Eid, as well as the Afghan government reciprocating and announcing its own,” Khalilzad said last Sunday.

Increasing Taliban attacks on government troops, and political infighting between Ghani and Abdullah over who would assume office as president, have delayed the talks.

After Washington failed to reconcile Ghani and Abdullah, both leaders agreed two weeks ago to share power, with Ghani leading the country for another five years and Abdullah appointed as chief of the peace talks.

Khalilzad described the cease-fire agreement as a “momentous opportunity that should not be missed,” and pressed both sides to agree on a new date to start negotiations.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo also urged the two sides to start peace talks, with the release of prisoners as a first step. 

Pompeo said that he expected the Taliban “to adhere to their commitment not to allow released prisoners to return to the battlefield.”

Ghani said the release of Taliban inmates would be “expedited” and that his government’s negotiating team was ready to begin talks “as soon as possible.”

Zabihullah Mujahid, a spokesman for the Taliban, could not be reached for comment on the Taliban’s stance.

In the past, the group has insisted it will take part in talks with Kabul only after all 5,000 Taliban prisoners are freed.

Experts hope the latest developments are a step in the right direction.

“The Taliban do not seem to have any reservations about the structure of the government team, so the hope is high that the talks will take place by June 15,” Wahidullah Ghazikhail, an analyst, told Arab News.

“Some of Taliban’s field commanders seem to be divided on the talks, hoping to capture power again after the departure of US forces (by next spring), while the political leaders are pushing for a political settlement,” he said.