Cambodian rescued after 4 days wedged in mountain rocks

Cambodian rescued after 4 days wedged in mountain rocks
1 / 2
Cambodian Sum Bora gets stuck in a rock's hollow at Battambang province in Cambodia on Aug. 7, 2019 while collecting bat droppings for sale. (Battambang province Authority Police via AP)
Cambodian rescued after 4 days wedged in mountain rocks
2 / 2
Cambodian rescuers carry Sum Bora, whom got wedged between rocks while collecting bat droppings in Battambang province, Cambodia. (Battambang province Authority Police via AP)
Updated 08 August 2019

Cambodian rescued after 4 days wedged in mountain rocks

Cambodian rescued after 4 days wedged in mountain rocks
  • The man slipped and got stuck in between rocks while trying to retrieve his flashlight that had fallen
  • He was collecting bat droppings, which he sells to farmers for use as fertilizer

PHNOM PENH, Cambodia: A man who got wedged between rocks while collecting bat droppings in the Cambodian jungle was rescued after being trapped for almost four days.
Police said Sum Bora slipped Sunday while trying to retrieve his flashlight, which had fallen in the small rocky hollow.
Bat droppings — guano — are used as fertilizer and sold for supplementary income by poor farmers, who sometimes try to attract bats to their property.
His worried family began searching for Sum Bora when he didn’t return after three days, Cambodia’s Fresh News reported. His brother found him and alerted authorities to his location in the Chakry mountain jungle in the northwestern province of Battambang.
About 200 rescue workers carefully extricated the trapped man by destroying bits of the rock that had pinned him in an effort that took about 10 hours, Police Maj. Sareth Visen said.
The 28-year-old man was freed at about 6 p.m. Wednesday, looking extremely weak, and was taken to a provincial hospital, the police official said.
The rescue was spearheaded by specialists from Rapid Rescue Company 711, which is connected to Prime Minister Hun Sen’s elite military bodyguard brigade. The group also was prominent in rescue efforts when a seven-story building collapsed in June in the southern city of Sihanoukville, killing 24 people.
Cambodia is one of the poorest countries in the world, with 35% of its 15.2 million people living in poverty, according to a UN Development Program report last year.


No-go for Joe Exotic: Donald Trump’s pardon list omits ‘Tiger King’

No-go for Joe Exotic: Donald Trump’s pardon list omits ‘Tiger King’
Updated 20 January 2021

No-go for Joe Exotic: Donald Trump’s pardon list omits ‘Tiger King’

No-go for Joe Exotic: Donald Trump’s pardon list omits ‘Tiger King’
  • Joe Exotic, whose real name is Joseph Maldonado-Passage, was sentenced in January 2020 to 22 years in federal prison
OKLAHOMA CITY: One name missing in President Donald Trump’s flurry of pardons is “Tiger King” Joe Exotic.
His team was so confident in a pardon that they’d readied a celebratory limousine and a hair and wardrobe team to whisk away the zookeeper-turned-reality-TV-star, who is now serving a 22-year federal prison sentence in Texas. But he wasn’t on the list announced Wednesday morning.
Joe Exotic, whose real name is Joseph Maldonado-Passage, was sentenced in January 2020 to 22 years in federal prison for violating federal wildlife laws and for his role in a failed murder-for-hire plot targeting his chief rival, Carole Baskin, who runs a rescue sanctuary for big cats in Florida. Baskin was not harmed.
Maldonado-Passage, who has maintained his innocence, was also sentenced for killing five tigers, selling tiger cubs and falsifying wildlife records. A jury convicted him in April 2019.
In his pardon application filed in September, Maldonado-Passage’s attorneys argued that he was “railroaded and betrayed” by others. Maldonado-Passage, 57, is scheduled to be released from custody in 2037, but his attorneys said in the application that “he will likely die in prison” because of health concerns.
Maldonado-Passage’s legal team did not immediately respond to a request for comment early Wednesday.
The blond mullet-wearing zookeeper, known for his expletive-laden rants on YouTube and a failed 2018 Oklahoma gubernatorial campaign, was prominently featured in the popular Netflix documentary “Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem and Madness.”