Norway mosque suspect rejects murder allegation

Police said they are considering adding a charge of “attempted act of terror.” (File/AFP)
Updated 12 August 2019

Norway mosque suspect rejects murder allegation

  • The attacker is 21 years old
  • He is suspected of murdering his 17 year old stepsister

OSLO: A Norwegian man suspected of killing his stepsister and opening fire at a mosque near Oslo rejects allegations of murder and attempted murder, his lawyer said Monday.

The man, identified by media as 21-year old Philip Manshaus, is suspected of murder in the death of his 17-year-old stepsister and attempted murder at the Al-Noor mosque on Saturday.

But police are considering adding a charge of “attempted act of terror.”

“I can confirm” he rejects the allegations, his lawyer Unni Fries told AFP.

The suspect is due to appear before a judge at one p.m. (1100 GMT) for a detention hearing. Police have called for it to take place behind closed doors.

The suspect entered the mosque in the affluent Oslo suburb of Baerum armed with at least two weapons and opened fire before being overpowered by a 65-year-old man who suffered minor injuries.

Hours after the attack, the body of a young woman was found in a home in Baerum and police on Sunday confirmed that it was the suspect’s 17-year-old stepsister.

According to local media, she was of Chinese origin and had been adopted by the companion of the suspect’s father.

Oslo’s acting chief of the police operation Rune Skjold said Sunday the investigation showed that the suspect appeared to hold “far-right” and “anti-immigrant” views.


Taliban kill 6 members of same Afghan family

Updated 19 January 2020

Taliban kill 6 members of same Afghan family

  • But Taliban deny any involvement, saying the attack Saturday was triggered by a personal dispute
  • The Taliban now control or hold sway over roughly half of Afghanistan

KABUL: Afghan officials said Sunday that the Taliban executed six members of the same family, including an infant girl, in a remote village in the country’s north.
The Taliban denied any involvement, saying the attack Saturday was triggered by a personal dispute.
However, local Afghan officials said the family was accused by the Taliban of working in prostitution. The insurgents sentenced them to death for immoral acts, then stormed the house and opened fire, according to Jawed Bedar, a spokesman for Faryab province’s governor.
The infant girl’s mother and twin sister survived, but both of the child’s legs had to be amputated, the spokesman said.
He said Afghan security forces deployed to the village early Sunday and helped evacuate the two survivors to the hospital.
He said the Taliban attacked the government troops when they arrived. The ensuing gunbattle killed three Taliban members, who Bedar said were involved in the family’s killing.
The Taliban control the village in Andkhoy district where the killings took place, making it difficult to accurately determine what happened, he added.
The Taliban now control or hold sway over roughly half of Afghanistan.
Locals in the area also disputed the accounts of prostitution. Instead, they claimed that a member of the slain family was a former Taliban militant who recently joined the peace process, according to Andkhoy district chief Sultan Mohammad Sanjer.
It was not immediately possible to reconcile the conflicting accounts.
The Taliban continue to stage near-daily attacks targeting Afghan and US forces, even as they hold peace talks with the US and have given the US envoy a document outlining their offer for a temporary cease-fire in Afghanistan.
Scores of Afghan civilians have also been killed in the crossfire and by roadside bombs planted by militants.

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