What We Are Reading Today: Consent by Donna Freitas

Updated 14 August 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Consent by Donna Freitas

  • The book recognizes the infuriating actions of institutions like universities

Consent is Donna Freitas’ account of the stalking and unwanted attention she faced as a graduate student in college.

Freitas delivers a forensic examination of the years she spent stalked by her professor, and uses her nightmarish experience to examine the ways in which we stigmatize, debate, and attempt to understand consent today. 

She highlights the hurdles and obstacles she had to go through, at first to try and deal with this on her own for a year before speaking up.

The book recognizes the infuriating actions of institutions like universities. 

Freitas was a bright-eyed PhD candidate at Georgetown who was inspired and passionate about her future as a professor when her life started to take a dark turn. “It is a very personal story to the author and yet it is a story that, while some pieces are changed and some have come out worse than others, many women in the world have experienced at one point or another,” said a review in goodreads.com.

Women and men “should understand how harassment and stalking feel and know that they do have a voice,” it added.


Little Mix’s Jade Thirlwall: ‘I was bullied for being Arab’

The singer's maternal grandfather is Yemeni and maternal grandmother Egyptian. (Getty)
Updated 05 June 2020

Little Mix’s Jade Thirlwall: ‘I was bullied for being Arab’

DUBAI: Girl group Little Mix’s star Jade Thirlwall has opened up about bullying she experienced as a teenager due to her Arab roots.

Speaking on the BBC “No Country For Young Women” podcast, the 2011 “X-Factor” finalist, whose maternal grandfather is Yemeni and maternal grandmother Egyptian, said that she felt “ashamed” of her background. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

oh hey it’s me shamelessly plugging #BreakUpSong for the 1847th time via a thirst trap pic

A post shared by jade amelia thirlwall (@jadethirlwall) on

“When I went to secondary school, I was literally one of three people of color in the school,” the 27-year-old music sensation, whose father is British, said.

“I remember one time I got pinned down in the toilets and they put a bindi spot on my forehead; it was horrific.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

look in the notebook.

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“I have constantly had this inner battle of not really knowing who I am, or where I fit in, or what community I fit into,” she said.

The singer recalled that she would put white powder on her face “to whiten” herself when performing on stage at her school.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

finding a new love for my natural hair⚡️

A post shared by jade amelia thirlwall (@jadethirlwall) on

After joining Little Mix, she “subconsciously” did not want to talk about her heritage for fear of being disliked.

“I think because I was bullied quite badly in school because of the color of my skin and for being Arab, I wasn’t very proud of who I was,” Thirlwall explained.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

category is: 80s realness @madison_phipps

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“I would hate to talk about my race and heritage and not say the right things,” she added.