Camel races, horse-riding competitions add color to Eid festivities in Tabuk

1 / 3
Camel races, horse riding competitions add color to Eid festivities in Tabuk. (SPA)
2 / 3
Camel races, horse riding competitions add color to Eid festivities in Tabuk. (SPA)
3 / 3
Camel races, horse riding competitions add color to Eid festivities in Tabuk. (SPA)
Updated 16 August 2019

Camel races, horse-riding competitions add color to Eid festivities in Tabuk

  • Eid Al-Adha celebrations in Tabuk are calm, inspired by the stability they are accustomed to through the gentle rhythm of life in the desert

Eid Al-Adha or “festival of the sacrifice” commemorates the story of the Prophet Ibrahim’s test of faith, when he was commanded by God to sacrifice his son. The legend holds that God stayed his hand, sparing the boy, and placed a ram in his place.

Muslims around the world celebrate this occasion, and the citizens of Tabuk are no different. People from the region are keen to revive this ceremony in their own way through celebrations that reflect the desert area’s authenticity and modernity.

Eid Al-Adha celebrations in Tabuk are calm, inspired by the stability they are accustomed to through the gentle rhythm of life in the desert.




Camel races, horse riding competitions add color to Eid festivities in Tabuk. (SPA)

After the prayers, the Haganah groups congratulate the citizens by performing Hajini songs. Every family heads home to slaughter sacrifices and prepare the Eid feast. Then, they go out to visit friends and relatives and exchange gifts, in a social habit inherited from their ancestors.

Abdullah Al-Atwi, who specializes in the popular heritage in the Tabuk region, said: “Celebrations in Tabuk are quite similar to the rest of the Kingdom’s regions. However, Tabuk is unique due to the Haganah bands who tour the region, chant Hajini melodies and ride camels decorated with shiny patterns to reflect their joy.”

The residents of the desert gather on the third day of Eid to hold a special ceremony in which they recite poems and revive their heritage, added Al-Atwi.

He said that the ceremony features camel racing, horse riding and camel competitions organized by the region’s youth. The festivities last until the early hours of dawn.

The Tabuk region in northwestern Saudi Arabia is a magnet for tourists drawn to its beautiful Red Sea coastal cities. 

It offers a wealth of tourist attractions that help to guarantee a rewarding visit.

 


Arabic anime voice actors prepare for new show at Riyadh expo

Updated 17 November 2019

Arabic anime voice actors prepare for new show at Riyadh expo

  • Waheed Jalal's voice acting as “Treasure Island” antagonist John Silver has captivated generations

RIYADH: Visitors to Riyadh’s first anime expo stopped by the first panel on Saturday unaware that they would be leaving the stage with memories renewed of their favorite voice actors of all time.

Waheed Jalal and Jihad Al-Atrashi will forever live on in the hearts of fans of “Grendizer” and “Treasure Island (Takarajima),” the two shows that introduced the Arab world to anime in the 1970s.

Jalal, whose voice acting as “Treasure Island” antagonist John Silver has captivated generations, expressed how delighted he was to be with the audience.

“I want to thank you and your Kingdom of generosity and culture,” he said.

Al-Atrash, who portrayed Duke Fleed, echoed his sentiments: “You are great people with great values, thank you to the people of the Kingdom that stand next to people of all nations.”

Jalal was touched by the audience’s love and warm welcome, “You guys are the reason we continued this far, without you it wouldn’t have been possible,” he told them.

“We’re persevering to this day because people loved these characters we portrayed so much, our other works pale in comparison,” he added.

Jalal said that the reason “Grendizer” remained with so many people is because of the values and morals depicted in the show, teaching generations to be loyal and loving to their nation and their people.

Artist and creator Ibrahim Al-Lami. (AN photo by Huda Bashatah)

The voice acting pair talked about the importance of speaking in formal Arabic in these shows. Jalal said it’s because “you’re presenting to the entire Arab world.”

Local dialects would be difficult for others to understand, so we must all aspire to perfect our formal Arabic, added Jalal.

Before concluding the talk, a teaser was played of the first Saudi anime “Makkeen” by artist and creator, Ibrahim Al-Lami, who announced that 60 percent of the work was completed through local efforts.

“We’ll introduce a new work that is by our people, written by our people and voiced by our people,” he said to the audience.

The work will feature characters voiced by Jalal and Al-Atrash, who have become symbolic to the Arab anime world. “I told them, this work wouldn’t be complete without you two,” said Lami on his choice of voice actors. “We want these works to see the light of day. We need to provide the new generations with tales of our own,” added Al-Atrash when asked why he wanted to partake in the anime.