Camel races, horse-riding competitions add color to Eid festivities in Tabuk

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Camel races, horse riding competitions add color to Eid festivities in Tabuk. (SPA)
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Camel races, horse riding competitions add color to Eid festivities in Tabuk. (SPA)
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Camel races, horse riding competitions add color to Eid festivities in Tabuk. (SPA)
Updated 16 August 2019

Camel races, horse-riding competitions add color to Eid festivities in Tabuk

  • Eid Al-Adha celebrations in Tabuk are calm, inspired by the stability they are accustomed to through the gentle rhythm of life in the desert

Eid Al-Adha or “festival of the sacrifice” commemorates the story of the Prophet Ibrahim’s test of faith, when he was commanded by God to sacrifice his son. The legend holds that God stayed his hand, sparing the boy, and placed a ram in his place.

Muslims around the world celebrate this occasion, and the citizens of Tabuk are no different. People from the region are keen to revive this ceremony in their own way through celebrations that reflect the desert area’s authenticity and modernity.

Eid Al-Adha celebrations in Tabuk are calm, inspired by the stability they are accustomed to through the gentle rhythm of life in the desert.




Camel races, horse riding competitions add color to Eid festivities in Tabuk. (SPA)

After the prayers, the Haganah groups congratulate the citizens by performing Hajini songs. Every family heads home to slaughter sacrifices and prepare the Eid feast. Then, they go out to visit friends and relatives and exchange gifts, in a social habit inherited from their ancestors.

Abdullah Al-Atwi, who specializes in the popular heritage in the Tabuk region, said: “Celebrations in Tabuk are quite similar to the rest of the Kingdom’s regions. However, Tabuk is unique due to the Haganah bands who tour the region, chant Hajini melodies and ride camels decorated with shiny patterns to reflect their joy.”

The residents of the desert gather on the third day of Eid to hold a special ceremony in which they recite poems and revive their heritage, added Al-Atwi.

He said that the ceremony features camel racing, horse riding and camel competitions organized by the region’s youth. The festivities last until the early hours of dawn.

The Tabuk region in northwestern Saudi Arabia is a magnet for tourists drawn to its beautiful Red Sea coastal cities. 

It offers a wealth of tourist attractions that help to guarantee a rewarding visit.

 


GCC summit calls for greater economic integration among Gulf countries 

Updated 48 min 29 sec ago

GCC summit calls for greater economic integration among Gulf countries 

  • Heads of the delegations land in Riyadh before the 40th Supreme Council meeting gets under way
  • King Salman tells the summit that the GCC has overcome many crises in its history

RIYADH: The GCC summit called for greater regional economic integration as the meeting chaired by King Salman came to a close in Riyadh on Tuesday.

The final statement, read by GCC General Secretary Abdullatif bin Rashid Al-Zayani, called for finalizing legislation for financial and monetary unity by 2025, according to the meeting's final communique.

The statement also called for boosting military and security cooperation to maintain regional security.

The 40th Supreme Council meeting was chaired by King Salman, who met the heads of each delegation as they landed.

They included the UAE Vice President and Prime Minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum, Bahrain's King Hamad bin Isa Al-Khalifa, Oman's Deputy Prime Minister for the Council of Ministers Fahd bin Mahmoud Al-Said and Qatar's Prime Minister Sheikh Abdullah bin Nasser bin Khalifa Al-Thani.

In his opening remarks, King Salman said the GCC had managed to overcome many crises that the region has faced.

At a preparatory meeting on Monday, Gulf foreign ministers approved the nomination of former Kuwaiti Finance Minister Nayef Al-Hajraf as the next secretary-general of the GCC.

His term will begin in April 2020 following the end of Al-Zayani’s term.