What We Are Reading Today: Affordable Housing in New York

Updated 17 August 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Affordable Housing in New York

Authors: Nicholas Dagen Bloom & Matthew Gordon Lasner

How has America’s most expensive and progressive city helped its residents to live? Since the 19th century, the need for high-quality affordable housing has been one of New York City’s most urgent issues. Affordable Housing in New York explores the past, present, and future of the city’s pioneering efforts, from the 1920s to the major initiatives of Mayor Bill de Blasio.
The book examines the people, places, and policies that have helped make New York livable, from early experiments by housing reformers and the innovative public-private solutions of the 1970s and 1980s to today’s professionalized affordable housing industry, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.
More than two dozen leading scholars tell the story of key figures of the era, including Fiorello LaGuardia, Robert Moses, Jane Jacobs, and Ed Koch. Over 25 individual housing complexes are profiled, including Queensbridge Houses, America’s largest public housing complex; Stuyvesant Town; Co-op City; and recent additions like Via Verde.


What We Are Reading Today: The Years That Matter Most by Paul Tough

Updated 20 September 2019

What We Are Reading Today: The Years That Matter Most by Paul Tough

The Years That Matter Most tells the stories of students trying to find their way, with hope, joy, and frustration, through the appli-cation process and into college.

Drawing on new research, the book reveals how the landscape of US higher education has shifted in recent decades and exposes the hidden truths of how the system works and whom it works for.

Author Paul Tough takes readers on a journey from Ivy League seminar rooms to community college welding shops, from giant public flagship universities to tiny experimental storefront colleges. 

Tough’s three previous books include How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character, which spent more than a year on the New York Times hardcover and paperback best-seller lists. 

In a review for The New York Times, Tara Westover said: “As Tough points out, wealthy universities have wealthy alumni, who, after benefiting from an elite education, are even better positioned to donate large sums of money. This is the final cog in the inequality machine, an intense cycle of wealth concentration.”