US removes some Chinese furniture, modems from planned 10% tariffs

The US’s $114 billion retail furniture industry, which relies on Chinese imports, has been among the sector’s hardest hit with price increases due to President Donald Trump’s tariffs. (AFP)
Updated 17 August 2019
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US removes some Chinese furniture, modems from planned 10% tariffs

  • US President Donald Trump on Tuesday delayed more than half of the proposed tariffs until December
  • The $114 billion retail furniture industry has been among the sector’s hardest hit with price increases due to Trump’s tariffs

WASHINGTON: The Trump administration is sparing some Chinese-made household furniture, baby items and Internet modems and routers from its next rounds of 10 percent tariffs, it said on Friday.
The US Trade Representative’s office released a complete list of the items that were removed from $300 billion in tariffs scheduled to go into effect on Sept. 1 and Dec. 15, some of which had already been hit with 25 percent tariffs.
Trump on Tuesday delayed more than half of the proposed tariffs until December, saying it would help shield businesses and consumers from the US-China trade war fallout during the Christmas selling season.
The new list of 44 categories of spared imports, worth about $7.8 billion according to US Census Bureau data, also includes some chemical compounds used in the manufacture of plastics. Reuters previously reported that bibles and religious texts would be spared from the tariff list.
Modems and routers made in China were part of a $200 billion list of products hit with tariffs last September that have since been raised to 25 percent. Friday’s exclusion would avoid a further 10 percent hike as Trump imposes tariffs on Sept. 1 to products in the same broad customs category, including smart watches, smart speakers and Bluetooth headphones.
The bulk of the items removed from the tariff list were furniture products, including wooden- and metal-framed chairs and those made of plastics. Some of these were previously hit with tariffs as part of broader furniture categories.
Baby-related furniture items also were spared, including toddler beds, bassinets, cradles, strollers and children’s seats.
The $114 billion retail furniture industry has been among the sector’s hardest hit with price increases due to Trump’s tariffs, which rose to 25 percent in May.
The US Labor Department said on Tuesday that the price index for household furnishings rose 0.4 percent in July, marking its third consecutive monthly increase and contributing to broad-based growth in consumer prices during July.


Rolls-Royce hit by further setback to fixing Boeing 787 engines

Updated 1 min 20 sec ago

Rolls-Royce hit by further setback to fixing Boeing 787 engines

  • The company faces £1.6 billion ($2 billion) in extra costs and disruption as a result of the engine problem
  • As of late February, Rolls said 35 787s were grounded globally due to engine blades corroding or cracking prematurely

Rolls-Royce will take longer than expected to fix problems with its Trent 1000 engine, frustrating efforts to get Boeing 787s grounded by the glitch flying again and knocking the British company’s shares.
Rolls-Royce, whose engines power large civil and military planes, said on Friday it had sped up turbine blade replacement for some models, leading to additional removals and delaying a reduction in the number of grounded aircraft to single figures until the second quarter of 2020.
The company faces £1.6 billion ($2 billion) in extra costs and disruption as a result of the engine problem, which is due to the poor durability of components, and the latest delay spells further frustration for its customers and investors.
Rolls-Royce, whose customers include more than 400 airlines, 160 armed forces and 70 navies, said in August that it would spend another £100 million to fix the issue.
“We perceived a risk that further action would be required, potentially leading to higher costs being incurred ... today’s announcement that guidance for the Trent 1000 cash costs in 2019 and 2020 remains unchanged comes as a relief,” Jefferies analysts, who rate the stock as “buy,” said.
Rolls-Royce CEO Warren East said in August that a target of fewer than 10 aircraft on the ground at the end of the year might take a bit longer to achieve as a result of an additional repair load resulting from faster deterioration of a blade on the Trent 1000 TEN.
The Trent 1000 TEN is the latest version of an engine that has had a problematic entry into service. As of late February, Rolls said 35 787s were grounded globally due to engine blades corroding or cracking prematurely.
“We deeply regret the additional disruption that this will cause our customers and we continue to work closely with them to minimize the impact on their operations,” Rolls-Royce said.
Airlines have faced disruptions because of the groundings, with Norwegian Air’s strategy switch to prioritize profits over growth hampered by the global grounding of Boeing’s 737 MAX aircraft and long-running problems with Rolls-Royce’s engines on Boeing Dreamliners.
Singapore Airlines has also grounded two 787-10 jets fitted with the Trent 1000 TEN engines.
Rolls-Royce is keen to avoid further problems with the engine and in March dropped out of the race to power Boeing’s planned mid-market aircraft.