British hijab-wearing model Mariah Idrissi has it covered

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Mariah Idrissi on the red carpet at a film premiere in London. (Getty Images)
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Mariah Idrissi sporting different modest fashion looks on her Instagram page. (Photo courtesy: Instagram)
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Mariah Idrissi sporting different modest fashion looks on her Instagram page. (Photo courtesy: Instagram)
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Mariah Idrissi on the red carpet at a film premiere in London. (Getty Images)
Updated 17 August 2019

British hijab-wearing model Mariah Idrissi has it covered

  • “Saudi Arabia is a blessed land both physically and spiritually,” Idrissi said
  • “I would love to be a part of changing some of the stereotypes around the country through my work in fashion and film,” Idrissi commented

LONDON: Born in North West London to Moroccan and Pakistani parents, model Mariah Idrissi has made quite a name for herself – starring in campaigns for major high street retailers, hosting TED Talks and sharing snaps of her travels with her 88,000 Instagram followers.
The hijab-wearing model has been vocal about her preference for modest fashion and spoke to Arab News about her style, faith and achievements.
“I wear hijab to represent my faith, my culture, and because I genuinely love the idea of modest dress,” she said. “I think it’s important to feel comfortable in what you wear and also not lose a sense of your personality, hence why there is so much diversity in modest styles.”


Her breakthrough came when she was scouted in a shopping center. She did not think it would lead to anything; however, she was casted for an H&M ad. “The campaign went viral. From that moment I realized how little the media represented Muslims, and if they did it was often negative. That motivated me to continue to pursue a career in fashion and change the narrative around how hijab is viewed in the West,” she explained.
She also gave her first significant public speech in 2016, a TEDxTeen live-streamed to millions, about how modest clothing has now become a trend. Idrissi believes the fashion industry is catering more to women who want modest wear than it did a decade ago.
“I feel it is definitely improving,” she said. “Summertime can still be a little bit of a struggle in comparison to autumn and winter which is cooler, so there is still room for improvement.”


After her breakthrough with H&M, Idrissi went on to participate in projects with leading brands, including MAC Cosmetics and M&S in the Middle East. She also looks forward to working on projects in Saudi Arabia when an opportunity arises.
“Saudi Arabia is a blessed land both physically and spiritually. I feel there is so much potential and opportunity. I would love to be a part of changing some of the stereotypes around the country through my work in fashion and film,” Idrissi said.
She is now working on a few film projects, both features and documentaries, to continue challenging negative stereotypes around Muslims.


Moreover, she aims to inspire other potential modest models and advises them to always ask why before embarking on this path. Asking why has helped her on this career journey because even through difficult times, she was able to push forward.
As her upbringing has taught her, Idrissi is demonstrating that modernity and progression are not in conflict with tradition and customs: They are two sides of the same coin.


Egyptian short film wins Cannes’ Palme d’Or

Updated 30 October 2020

Egyptian short film wins Cannes’ Palme d’Or

DUBAI: Egyptian director Sameh Alaa’s movie “I Am Afraid to Forget Your Face” has won the coveted Palme d’Or in the Cannes Film Festival’s short-film competition. 

Starring Seif Eldin Hemida and Nourhan Ali Abdelazez, the 15-minute movie tells the story of a man who undertakes a difficult journey after two months of separation in the hope of a reunion. It was the only Arab film selected to compete for the prestigious prize. 

The festival congratulated the director in an online post on Thursday, writing: “Tonight he won the short-film Palme d’Or 2020. Congratulations to Egyptian director Sameh Alaa.”

“I Am Afraid to Forget Your Face” was selected along with 10 other shorts. 

The movie been selected among 10 other shorts. (Supplied)

The film was up against “Blue Fear” by Marie Jacotey and Lola Halifa-Legrand; the Evi Kalogiropoulou-directed “Motorway65”; “Sudden Light” from Sophie Littman; “Son of Sodom” by Theo Montaya; Paul Nouhet’s “Camille Contactless”; and “Benjamin, Benny, Ben” from Paul Shkordoff, among others. 

The 11 shorts were selected from a total of 3,810 films from 137 countries, the festival said on its website.

“I Am Afraid to Forget Your Face” is the first Egyptian film to be nominated and to win the award.