What We Are Reading Today: Democratic Equality by James Lindley Wilson

Updated 17 August 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Democratic Equality by James Lindley Wilson

  • It mounts a bold and persuasive defense of democracy as a way of making collective decisions

Democracy establishes relationships of political equality, ones in which citizens equally share authority over what they do together and respect one another as equals. 

But in today’s divided public square, democracy is challenged by political thinkers who disagree about how democratic institutions should be organized, and by antidemocratic politicians who exploit uncertainties about what democracy requires and why it matters. 

Democratic Equality mounts a bold and persuasive defense of democracy as a way of making collective decisions, showing how equality of authority is essential to relating equally as citizens, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

James Lindley Wilson explains why the US Senate and Electoral College are urgently in need of reform, why proportional representation is not a universal requirement of democracy, how to identify racial vote dilution and gerrymandering in electoral districting, how to respond to threats to democracy posed by wealth inequality, and how judicial review could be more compatible with the democratic ideal.


What We Are Reading Today: The Less People Know About Us

Updated 21 October 2019

What We Are Reading Today: The Less People Know About Us

Author: Axton Betz-Hamilton

In this true crime memoir, an award-winning identity theft expert tells the shocking story of the duplicity and betrayal that inspired her career and nearly destroyed her family.
The Less People Know About Us is Axton Betz-Hamilton’s attempt to untangle an intricate web of lies, and to understand why and how a loved one could have inflicted such pain.
Axton “presents a candid, shocking, and redemptive story and reveals her courageous effort to grapple with someone close that broke the unwritten rules of love, protection, and family,” said a review in goodreads.com.
Melanie Thernstrom said in a review for The New York Times that the book “is intimate and engrossing but can also have a claustrophobic, cluttered feel in its thicket of details. As many memoirs do, it includes experiences that were personally formative but are extraneous to the narrative.”
The Less People Know About Us was written in collaboration with Ashley Stimpson, a talented freelance journalist and professional ghostwriter who describes herself as a “story surrogate,” said the review.