Sudan protesters, army postpone announcement on ruling body

An elderly Sudanese man flashes the victory sign as he joins others celebrating after signing the constitutional declaration between the ruling military council and protest movement, in Khartoum, Sudan, 04 August 2019. (File/EPA)
Updated 19 August 2019

Sudan protesters, army postpone announcement on ruling body

CAIRO: Sudan’s ruling military council says the country’s pro-democracy movement has asked for a delay on the announcement of a joint ruling body because of last-minute, internal disputes over appointees.
The 11-member sovereign council is to rule Sudan for a little over three years until elections can be held.
It was created under a power-sharing deal between the military and the protesters and was to be announced on Sunday.
But the military council’s spokesman Shams el-Din Kabashi said Monday that the movement withdrew its appointees to the council and would hold more consultations among its factions.
The development comes after internal disputes within the Sudanese Professionals Association, one of the opposition factions, over its nominee. The SPA had spearheaded Sudan’s protests that led to the ouster of longtime autocrat Omar Al-Bashir.


Iran says it is preparing for satellite launch

Updated 58 min 54 sec ago

Iran says it is preparing for satellite launch

  • Iran tried and failed to launch two satellites into orbit in January and February last year
  • Iran has sent several satellites into orbit over the past decade

TEHRAN: Iran said Sunday that two newly constructed satellites have passed pre-launch tests and will be transported to the nation's space center for eventual launch, without elaborating.
Telecommunications Minister Mohammad Javad Azari Jahromi tweeted about the development, calling it an “important research step.”
Iran has not said when it will launch the satellites, but often coordinates its launches with national holidays. It will celebrate the 41st anniversary of the Islamic Revolution next month.
Iran's largely state-run media say the 90-kilogram (200-pound) Zafar satellites each have four high-resolution color cameras and will monitor and transmit data on natural resources as well as agricultural and environmental developments.
Iran says its satellite program, like its nuclear activities, is aimed at scientific research and other civilian applications. The US and other Western countries have long been suspicious of the program because the same technology can be used to develop long-range missiles.
Iran tried and failed to launch two satellites into orbit in January and February last year.
A rocket exploded inside the Imam Khomeini Space Center in August during what officials later said was a test-launch. Iranian officials did not acknowledge the mishap until satellite imagery showed the explosion. Officials blamed a technical malfunction.
In a separate incident, a fire killed three researchers at the space center, which is some 240 kilometers (150 miles) southeast of the capital, Tehran.
Iran has sent several satellites into orbit over the past decade, and in 2013 it launched a monkey into space.