Grand Egyptian Museum symbol of Japan cooperation

An archaeologist works on restoring relief sculptures at the Baron Empain Palace in Cairo’s suburb Heliopolis. (Reuters)
Updated 20 August 2019

Grand Egyptian Museum symbol of Japan cooperation

  • The museum will house thousands of monuments and artifacts including mummies

CAIRO: The Grand Egyptian Museum (GEM), set to open in 2022, is already a beacon for future Egyptian prosperity.

Built to showcase Egypt’s civilization and heritage, the museum will house thousands of monuments and artifacts including mummies, as well as housing a very important restoration center which will help in preserving Egyptian Pharaonic heritage.

It is hoped the GEM will boost tourism, and act as beacon of a new, forward-facing nation in the aftermath of several years of political upheaval, and centuries of losing its treasures overseas.

Egypt began work on the museum in 2008 at a cost of approximately $550 million, with the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities funding $100 million, with the remainder facilitated through a loan from the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), in addition to local and international donations.

Covering the third phase of the build, Japanese support was not limited to the loan, but extended to the financial and technical support of the museum’s preservation and conservation center. 

Moreover, Japan currently supports the museum’s archaeological database and the team chosen to cultivate and manage it. 

The JICA also organizes a program that holds several restoration training sessions in both Egypt and Japan, in partnership with the Tokyo National Research Institute for Cultural Properties. 

Egypt’s Ambassador to Japan Ayman Kamel talked about the details of Japan’s participation in constructing the GEM.

“This project, which was launched years ago, is a success story in Egyptian-Japanese bilateral relations,” Kamel said.

BACKGROUND

It is hoped the Grand Egyptian Museum will boost tourism, and act as beacon of a new, forward-facing nation in the aftermath of several years of political upheaval, and centuries of losing its treasures overseas.

He added that Japan contributed in supporting one of the Egyptian centers specializing in monument restoration, providing “unmatched” Japanese eco-friendly materials and technology. 

Kamel predicted that following its inauguration, the GEM would be a source of pride not only for Egypt and Japan but also for the whole world.

“The final inauguration will take place in 2022 when all construction operations are completed.”

Japan’s Ambassador to Egypt Masaki Noke said the GEM was a “huge project that transfers heritage to the coming generations” and hailed Egypt for carrying out “this huge archaeological project.” 

Noke added that the Japanese were very happy to participate in this huge achievement which he considered of paramount importance “not only on the economic level but also on the human level in general.”

Around 42,000 Japanese tourists visited Egypt in 2018, adding to an increasingly large community of Japanese residents, and a sizable presence of archaeological missions working in the country.  

Egyptian archaeological expert Ahmed Kadry told Arab News that there are currently 10 Japanese archaeological missions in Egypt with universities and institutions.

Kadry said that the GEM’s inauguration in 2022 will change the perspective of museum tourism the world over, and hailed to work of Japanese and Egyptian archaeologists for their work in the field of diagnostic examination of monuments by using hand-held devices called XRFs, a primary examination machine using X-rays.

He added the results of such examinations provided useful information regarding the preparation of painted layers “which help in not only deepening the understanding of the condition of murals once they are restored but also in conducting more research to gain more knowledge in the field of archaeology.”

In July 2018, Dr. Tadayuki Hara, an associate professor and senior research fellow at the Institute for Tourism Studies, gave a lecture on how to improve the value of touristic assets in Egypt at the Japanese Embassy in Cairo, where he cited the importance of the GEM in Egypt’s future.

“Revenues can be created through great memories,” Dr. Hara said. “That can be achieved through the GEM, the project that Japan is taking part in constructing.”


Sheikha Shamma calls for balance between economic, environmental resilience

Updated 7 min 26 sec ago

Sheikha Shamma calls for balance between economic, environmental resilience

  • UAE royal: Coronavirus pandemic necessitates “a more sustainable future”
  • “We must adopt technologies and business models that increase both financial and environmental efficiency,” she said

LONDON: The spread of coronavirus has given the world an opportunity to strike a balance between building economic and environmental resilience, the UAE’s Sheikha Shamma bint Sultan bin Khalifa Al-Nahyan said on Thursday during a webinar attended by Arab News.
“As governments, we must continue to encourage the diversification of GDP (gross domestic product) contribution and exploration of new and sustainable industries. As investors, we need to make more responsible decisions with our investments,” said Sheikha Shamma, who is CEO of Alliances for Global Sustainability and founder of the Circle of Hope foundation.
“As businesses, we must adopt technologies and business models that increase both financial and environmental efficiency. And as individuals, we must rethink our approach to these sources, support local producers and work toward creating a circular economy,” she added.
“My hope is that in these difficult times, we won’t just find ways to overcome challenges but seek out opportunities that pave the way toward a more sustainable future.”
The webinar, titled “The State of the Environment post-COVID,” was hosted by the UK-based Emirates Society.
It featured Lord Goldsmith, UK minister of state for the Pacific, international environment, climate and forests, and animal welfare, as well as Dominic Jermey, director general of the Zoological Society of London.
“The numbers really speak for themselves, and they reflect a litany of devastation,” Lord Goldsmith said. He highlighted how populations of animals have on average more than halved, with around 1 million species facing extinction within decades, while every minute on average the world loses 30 football pitches worth of forests.
“A third of marine animals are threatened with extinction and, if trends continue, we’re told that by 2050 the oceans will contain more plastic than fish, as measured by waves,” he said.
“We need economists, businesses and markets to develop tools fast to value things like nature and attach a cost to things that we need to phase out like emissions, deforestation, plastic pollution and so on.”
Jermey, who was Britain’s ambassador to the UAE from 2010 to 2014, called COVID-19 a “wake-up call.”
He added: “Those pathogens, that 75 percent of emerging infectious diseases that move from wildlife to people, are increasingly making that transition. We have to rethink, holistically, our relationship with nature.”