Australia joins US-led mission to protect Hormuz shipping

Australia joins US-led mission to protect Hormuz shipping
Australia is going to provide ‘modest, time limited’ support to the US-led operation ensuring the protection of international shipping in the Strait of Hormuz (File/John Luke McGovern/Navy Office of Information/AFP)
Updated 21 August 2019

Australia joins US-led mission to protect Hormuz shipping

Australia joins US-led mission to protect Hormuz shipping
  • Prime Minister Scott Morrison said Wednesday that Australia will contribute troops
  • An Australian warship will be redirected from an anti-piracy operation in the Middle East

CANBERRA, Australia: Australia has joined Britain and Bahrain in signing onto a US-led maritime security mission to protect international shipping in the Strait of Hormuz.
Prime Minister Scott Morrison said Wednesday that Australia will contribute troops, a surveillance plane and a Navy frigate to protect shipping lanes off the coast of Iran.
He says it’s a “modest, meaningful and time-limited” contribution in Australia’s national and economic interests.
At least 15 percent of crude oil and up to 30 percent of refined oil destined for Australia transits through the Arabian Gulf.
The warship will be redirected from an anti-piracy operation in the Middle East, while the Australian troops will be based in the headquarters that are coordinating the US-led maritime security mission.
Initially, Australia will be involved for at least six months.


Iranian missiles land 100 miles from US aircraft carrier strike group in Indian Ocean

An Iranian “Noor” long-range anti-ship missile is fired from a warship during an Iranian navy military drill in the Gulf of Oman. (File/AFP)
An Iranian “Noor” long-range anti-ship missile is fired from a warship during an Iranian navy military drill in the Gulf of Oman. (File/AFP)
Updated 32 sec ago

Iranian missiles land 100 miles from US aircraft carrier strike group in Indian Ocean

An Iranian “Noor” long-range anti-ship missile is fired from a warship during an Iranian navy military drill in the Gulf of Oman. (File/AFP)
  • At least two other Iranian ballistic missiles exploded on impact when they hit the ocean
  • USS Nimitz has remained in the northern Arabian Sea on the orders of outgoing President Donald Trump

LONDON: Long-range Iranian missiles rained down dangerously close to a commercial ship in the Indian Ocean on Saturday and 100 miles from the US Nimitz aircraft carrier strike group, Fox News reported. 

US officials, who wished to remain anonymous, said that at least one of the missiles landed 20 miles from the commercial vessel.

At least two other Iranian ballistic missiles exploded on impact when they hit the ocean, about 100 miles away from the USS Nimitz aircraft carrier strike group.

Shards of debris flew in all directions on impact, the US news channel said. 

"We were expecting the missile launch," an official told Fox News, but there was concern about just how close Iran was willing to push its limits. 

Nimitz has remained in the northern Arabian Sea on the orders of outgoing President Donald Trump.

The Pentagon changed its mind and ordered the Nimitz to turn around and remain in the region earlier this month after it left the Arabian Gulf and was due to return home.

“Due to the recent threats issued by Iranian leaders against President Trump and other US government officials, I have ordered the USS Nimitz to halt its routine redeployment,” Acting Secretary of Defense Chris Miller said on January 3. 

“The USS Nimitz will now remain on station in the US Central Command area of operations.”

January 3 marked the one-year anniversary of the assassination of Qasem Soleimani, the head of Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC).

The Islamic Republic has vowed to avenge the general’s death.