What We Are Reading Today: How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi

Updated 23 August 2019
0

What We Are Reading Today: How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi

In this book, Ibram X. Kendi weaves together an electrifying combination of ethics, history, law, and science, bringing it all together with an engaging personal narrative of his own awakening to antiracism.

How to Be an Antiracist is an “essential work for anyone who wants to go beyond an awareness of racism to the next step: Contributing to the formation of a truly just and equitable society,” said a review in goodreads.com.

Critic Jeffrey C. Stewart said in a review for The New York Times that Kendi is on a mission to push those of us who believe we are not racists to become something else: Antiracists, who support ideas and policies affirming that “the racial groups are equals in all their apparent differences — that there is nothing right or wrong with any racial group.” 

Steward said: “For Kendi, the founding director of the Antiracist Research and Policy Center at American University, there are no nonracists; there are only racists — people who allow racist ideas to proliferate without opposition — and antiracists, those who expose and eradicate such ideas wherever they encounter them.”


What We Are Reading Today: The Years That Matter Most by Paul Tough

Updated 20 September 2019

What We Are Reading Today: The Years That Matter Most by Paul Tough

The Years That Matter Most tells the stories of students trying to find their way, with hope, joy, and frustration, through the appli-cation process and into college.

Drawing on new research, the book reveals how the landscape of US higher education has shifted in recent decades and exposes the hidden truths of how the system works and whom it works for.

Author Paul Tough takes readers on a journey from Ivy League seminar rooms to community college welding shops, from giant public flagship universities to tiny experimental storefront colleges. 

Tough’s three previous books include How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character, which spent more than a year on the New York Times hardcover and paperback best-seller lists. 

In a review for The New York Times, Tara Westover said: “As Tough points out, wealthy universities have wealthy alumni, who, after benefiting from an elite education, are even better positioned to donate large sums of money. This is the final cog in the inequality machine, an intense cycle of wealth concentration.”