Saudis switch from TV to mobile video

A man records a video with his phone in Berlin, Germany, August 24, 2019. (REUTERS)
Updated 26 August 2019

Saudis switch from TV to mobile video

  • Short online films are watched most during the traditional primetime TV slot between 5pm and 11pm, for an average of 53 minutes

RIYADH: More Saudis watch short online videos than traditional TV, a new study suggests. Researchers found that more than 85 percent of Saudis viewed videos lasting less than 10 minutes at least once a day. Eight out of 10 watched premium professional short films every day, while only seven out of 10 watched traditional TV every day.
Short online films are watched most during the traditional primetime TV slot between 5pm and 11pm, for an average of 53 minutes.
Of those surveyed, 93 percent said mobile video helped them discover new and unique content, and 91 percent said it stimulated their minds, put them in a positive mood and gave them a chance to take a break from their daily lives.
“Saudis are some of the most avid short-form video consumers in the world,” said Andy Pang, head of international marketing science at Snapchat, the multimedia messaging app, which commissioned the survey.

HIGHLIGHT

A new study shows that while more video is being consumed than ever before in the Kingdom, there are major changes in viewing habits.

“With one of the highest levels of mobile Internet penetration, and one of the highest social messaging and media usage rates in the Middle East, Saudi Arabia is poised for a mobile, short-form expansion that may even eclipse more established markets.”
For the survey, Snapchat commissioned the National Research Group, an independent market research company, to conduct a representative study of 869 Saudis.

 


Dr. Kholood Mohamed, head of Tabuk’s regional council

Updated 12 August 2020

Dr. Kholood Mohamed, head of Tabuk’s regional council

Dr. Kholood Mohamed has become the first woman in the Kingdom to head Tabuk’s regional council, with the Saudi interior minister approving her appointment as the body’s secretary-general.
Al-Khamis called on Tabuk Gov. Prince Fahd bin Sultan on Monday and the prince congratulated her on her new position, emphasizing the role of Saudi women in government agencies.
She is an assistant professor of inorganic chemistry and supervisor of the chemistry department at the University of Tabuk.
She joined the university in 2010 as a teaching assistant in the science faculty, later becoming a lecturer and then being promoted to associate professor.
She did her doctorate in inorganic chemistry from Howard University in the US in 2018. She obtained her master’s degree from King Saud University in Riyadh and her bachelor’s degree from the University of Tabuk.
Al-Khamis is a member of several scientific bodies such as the Supreme Committee of Prince Fahd bin Sultan Award for Scientific Excellence, American Chemical Society, and the Committee for the National Olympiad for Scientific Creativity.
She has presented many research studies during her career, and participated locally and abroad in specialist activities in the science field.